Tag Archives: Entertainment

Nihilism & gastronomics: Finding the best burger in town

Robert Kroll

Guest Writer

When presented with the task of reviewing the “Best Burger in Port Huron,” I didn’t back down. Other writers at the ESG were unable to step to the challenge. My reputation as a nihilistic burger eater was picked up on and my quest was laid out.

The only real scientific aspect of this project is that I will just go for a regular, no-frills burger. During my search, I may very well have missed the “great white buffalo” of burgers in town. I will do my best here to fairly present what I have put my body through.

Power’s

I haven’t been to Power’s since I was a regular student here, so this is a treat.

I order a quarter pound burger with cheese, fries and a coke. I am very pleased with what I have been served. The texture is perfect and the beef ground just enough.

Grade:  4 – Win

Calories so far:  4,000

Mama Vicki’s

For the sake of continuity, I once again order a quarter pound cheeseburger, fries, and a coke. I finish it off easily.

But there is nothing significant to sway my opinion about the burger. There is nothing wrong with it, but there is also nothing that I’m going crazy about either.

Grade: 3 – Passing

Calories so far: 5,000

Zebra Bar

I ordered the “Classic” cheeseburger, which is actually 1/3 of a pound, costs about 50 cents cheaper than the Mama Vicki’s, and is amazing.

The major perk though is the bun. While not the texture of the Power’s burger, it was toasted. This is a game changer. This is like pulling Steve Yzerman from a Stanley Cup finals game and replacing him with Gordie Howe.

Grade: 5 – EPIC WIN

Calories so far: 7,000

Quay Street Brewery

I went for the Brew House Burger, which is the Quay version of everything that came before, this time with mandatory beer batter fries. Regrettably, this was the only chance I’d get to have any sort of beer with this meal.

The burger was good, but it occupied a middle ground between Mama Vicki’s and the Zebra. It was better than Mama Vicki’s, but the toasted bun at Zebra set a precedent, like how every new Metallica album is compared to “the old stuff.”

Grade: 4 – WIN

End calories: OVER 9,000

Wrapping it up

I hereby declare that, for now, the Zebra has the best burger in Port Huron.

Rush headlines Rogers Bayfest 2010

Breigh Edmondson

Staff Writer

Sarnia, Ontario is once again playing host to a rocking summer of music as classic rockers Rush and the Scorpions headline the six day Rogers Bayfest Festival July 8 through 10, and 16 through 18.

According to the Rogers Bayfest website, feature bands and openers are as follows:

July 8: Bobnoxious, Cinderella, The Scorpions

July 9: Rush (No openers have been announced)

July 10: Crash Karma, Sam Roberts Band, Weezer

July 16: Aaron Lines, The Road Hammers, Keith Urban

July 17: Marshall Dane, Dean Brody, Shane Yellowbird, Alan Jackson.

Hip-hop stars the Black Eyed Peas will round up the star lineup on July 18.

Tickets for the 12th Rogers Bayfest went on sale April 17, and according to the Rogers Bayfest Facebook page, the phones have been ringing “off the hook” ever since. Various ticket pickup locations include places in Sarnia. The only local ticket pickup location is Kraft 8 Theatre in Fort Gratiot.

Ticket prices for the festival range from individual band tickets, to rock and/or country day passes.

Rock passes start as low as $86, but adding Black Eyed Peas to the pass would be $122. For rock pass licensed VIP tickets, prices are as high as $280 each.

Country passes start as low as $64 for unlicensed general admission, but for a licensed VIP ticket, with Black Eyed Peas, costs $335.

Individual band ticket costs are shown below (from lowest price to highest):

The Scorpions Thursday, July 8: $24.99, $28.99, $54.99, 74.99

Rush Friday, July 9: $45.99, $49.99, $119.99, $149.99

Weezer Saturday, July 10: $34.99, $38.99, $89.99, $99.99

Keith Urban Friday, July 16: $45.99, $49.99, $99.99, $129.99

Alan Jackson Saturday, July 17: $32.99, $36.99, $85.99, $115.99

The Black Eyed Peas Sunday, July 18:  $45.99, $49.99, $119.99, $139.99

More Information about Rogers Bayfest can be found at www.sarniabayfest.com

Celebrating five years

Twana Pinskey

Photo Editor

A cornucopia of talent and musical genius was evident as Saint Clair County Community College students presented “Tapestry,” the latest in the “Thursday at Noon Concert Series” April 15 at the SC4 Fine Arts Theatre in Port Huron.

This year’s presentation marks the fifth anniversary of “Tapestry” at SC4.

According to SC4 student and “Tapestry” performer, Amanda Carnat, “Tapestry” was started five years ago to offer dancers, musicians and singers the needed place to perform.

“We needed a place to perform. [“Tapestry”] is getting better every year,” replied Carnat. SC4 Visual and Performing Arts Adjunct Instructor and “Thursday at Noon Concert Series” host, Lillian Maley, discussed “Tapestry” as being a place where the students could learn.

She voiced her pleasure about the student’s performance. “I thought they were wonderful,” replied Maley.

Cello player and SC4 student, Chad Northcutt, composed an original composition entitled, “Winter Scenes” that was performed during the concert.

Accordingly pieces were performed from the SC4 choir that included 19th-20th century Folk music, Broadway as well as Classical presentations. Gasps of surprise and bursts of applause rippled through the audience as each group performed.

“The choir was wonderful,” said Jack Recor of Fort Gratiot Michigan. Recor felt the students had done a good job. SC4 students shared his sentiments.

SC4 student, Business Management major and event performer, 20 year old Sean Lathrop of Port Huron felt the “Tapestry” performance was a good way to show creative expression. “We don’t get a lot of opportunity to show off our skills and talents, so this was great,” replied Lathrop.

Upcoming events at the Fine Arts Theatre include: noon concert, “Boogie Woogie Babies” on April 22; SC4 Theatre Performance, “Young King Arthur” on May 15. Information on either of these events can be obtained by calling the SC4 Visual and Performing Arts at: 810-989-5709.

Reflections of India at SC4

Twana Pinskey

Photo Editor

   “Reflections of India,” the latest in SC4’s “Thursday at noon” concert series provided listeners with classical, Hindustani music, on April 1 at the Fine Arts auditorium in Port Huron.

   During the concert, sitarist Brock Dale of Toronto and Tabalist, Nicholas McKinlay, also of Toronto, performed selections from Bhairav, Kafi, Purvi, Malkauns, Bilawal and Manji Khamaj.

   Dale and McKinlay auditioned to be a part of the “Thursday at noon” series in an unusual way.

   “They had no CD’s of their music for use to audition with, so I listened to them on the phone,” said concert host Lillian Maley.

   Brock Dale was not seated in the usual position for a musician playing a sitar.

According to Dale, he was recovering from tail bone surgery, three days before performing at SC4. This made it difficult for him to perform at a traditional stance.

   Eastern hemisphere music, however, was not always embedded into Dale’s life.

   “I began as a student of western classical music and rock and roll, with jazz and blues thrown in as well,” said Dale. According to Dale, his mentor loaned him her sitar for a year. “I grew by leaps and bounds that year. I played every day,” he said.

   Dale said his life changing moment came when he saw sitarist, Ravi Shankar, perform. “He (Shankar) was 87 years old when I saw him perform with his daughter,” replied Dale.

   “I thought it (concert) was very relaxing and interesting,” said 18 year old Cody Kimball.

 Kimball, broadcasting major and an SC4 student ambassador, would like to see more of these types of events in the future.

   “It was nice to see a multi-cultural experience like this at SC4,” said Kimball.

   The next “Thursday at Noon” concert presentation scheduled is “Tapestry.” It will be performed on April 15 at the Fine Arts Theatre in Port Huron.

‘Titanic’ disaster

Brian Johnston

Editor in Chief

   Stop me if you’ve heard this one.

   Sam Worthington plays a half-human, half-something-else. There’s a war going on between the humans and the non-humans, and it’s up to Sam to save the day.

   Is that “Avatar” or is it “Terminator: Salvation?” Neither. It’s “Clash of the Titans.”

   In the latest adaptation of the Greek epic, Sam Worthington plays Perseus, half-human son of Zeus.  After his adopted family become casualties of the war between the gods and mortals, Perseus winds up a prisoner of the Argos.

   While in Argo, Perseus witnesses Hades (Ralph Fiennes) offer an ultimatum to King Cepheus (Vincent Regan): Kill his daughter Andromeda (Alexa Davalos) within 10 days, or the Kraken will be unleashed on Argo.

   So far, this sounds like the Ray Harryhausen film from 1981. Suddenly it takes a sharp turn, and stays off track for the rest of the film.

   For starters, it must be in Worthington’s contract to make callbacks to his other movies. While witnessing a Pegasus prancing around, Io (Gemma Arterton) comments that no one has ever ridden one before. In “Avatar,” Sam Worthington rides some dragon-beast that nobody has ever ridden.

   Later, Perseus says of his Demigod status, “I don’t know what I am,” a line straight from “Terminator Salvation.”

   This is to say nothing of the 3D effects. Originally shot in 2D, the film was converted to 3D in post-production. And it shows. The film doesn’t have the “jump-off-the-screen” quality of “My Bloody Valentine 3D,” nor does it have the depth and scenery that “Avatar” have.

   Any time there’s an action scene, the camera shakes as if the Director of Photography is afraid the actors will turn on him. This is an attempt to make the action more frantic, but 3D doesn’t work if you can’t see what’s going on.

   This movie would have been a “pass” or a “rent” if were in 2D. The added 3D ticket cost makes something to avoid.

   Sam Worthington seems to be making a living by playing half-humans. This movie feels half-baked.

ZDC rises with the dead

Ray Robinson

Managing Editor

   SC4’s Zombie Defense Council is having an “orientation screening” of the George A. Romero horror classic “Night of the Living Dead” in an effort to raise funds to defend the world from the uprising of the undead.

   The event is taking place in room 201 on the second floor of SC4’s Clara E. Mackenzie building from 7-10 p.m. on Friday, April 16 and the cost is “a measly $5” and popcorn is included.

   Future orientation screening titles may include “King of the Zombies,” “Revolt of the Zombies,” “White Zombie,” and other titles could be brought up in the future

   The Zombie Defense Council’s Prime Minister Cody Kimball and Advisor Overlord Robert Kroll hope that these events will raise money so that they will be able to hold “bigger and better” events in the future.

   Planned events for the future include a campus wide capture the flag competition during stress breaker week.

   The Zombie Defense Council is looking to produce instructional DVD’s to help aid the general public in their survival of  the overrun world of undead.

   If forced to renegade tactics in efforts to survive every possible scenario of zombie death and mayhem, ZDC hopes to aid those in need.

   If anyone is interested in joining this cause or learning more about the ZDC’s mission, you can contact Bob Kroll at rgkroll@sc4.edu

A whirling good time

“Hot Tub Time Machine” © MGM and United Artists Production Finance LLC
“Hot Tub Time Machine” © MGM and United Artists Production Finance LLC

Garrett Gavin

Staff Writer

   Don’t expect an Oscar nomination, but “Hot Tub Time Machine” is an entertaining movie with quite a few laughs along the way.

   The Movie chronicles the story of four friends who aren’t exactly living the lives they thought they would.

   Adam (John Cusack) has just been dumped; Jacob (Clark Duke) plays Adam’s nephew who thinks the only thing to life is playing video games in his basement; Craig (Craig Robinson) has a wife who cheats on him; Lou (Rob Cordry) is a party animal who just can’t find the party anymore.

   Concerned by Lou’s reckless ways, Adam, Craig and Jacob bring him to a ski resort where they had partied over twenty years before, to help Lou move on.

   Shortly after checking in, the four decide to take their party to the hot tub with some help from the hotel repair man (Chevy Chase). 

   When they wake up from their excessive drinking, the guys don’t really know what happened the night before, but something seems different. Shortly after, they find out what has changed. It’s 1986.

   Once they get over the shock of traveling through time, the guys decide that they want to change some of the things that have happened to them over the years. 

   Adam, Lou, and Craig want to warn themselves so that they can avoid both physical and emotional pain. Jacob, however, was not yet born in 1986 and wants to change as little as possible to ensure he will still be born. 

   Each character provides a comical situation that makes the movie work. This may have been the best comedy of the year so far, provided you can accept the ridiculous plot. 

   If you like the comedy these actors have done in the past, then this would be a use for you.

Critical still is catching Critical Bill

Cadi Parker

Staff Writer

 Ever beat on your steering wheel, adrenaline surging through your veins?

   Screamed at the top of your lungs?

   Flat-out rocked out to a new album?

   When music is intense and relatable, it’ll heat you up and burn you down.

   “Critical Bill,” a self proclaimed borderline rock/rap band, hit the music scene hard, Saturday, March 13. The band played a sold out show at the Emerald Theatre in Mt. Clemens followed by an after party at Hayloft, also in Mt. Clemens, to celebrate their new release, “The Underground Kingdom.”

   The line-up, “Hell Rides North,” “Lithium,” “Madonna Brothers” and “Stellardrive,” served as fuel to the fire, creating an ever-growing sense of chaos for the packed house. Fans partied hard, jammed out and moshed to guitar hard-ons.

   For some rockers, it was their first “Critical” show, but others were familiar with the electric energy put out by the band, like fan George Wright.

   “I like that I know I’ll get, a good show,” said Wright, 25, Mt. Clemens. “I’ve been a fan for a while. I try to catch the ones I can.”

   It’s been a long road for “Critical Bill,” cross-country touring several times, but they don’t mind the attention from radio stations or fans like Wright.

   “We strive to move forward,” said the band’s drummer, known as C-bass. “Our success is like a snow ball rolling downhill, we just keep getting larger and larger.”

   “The Underground Kingdom” is their fifth album. The first three albums were put out by the band themselves. Powerdise, the band’s lead vocalist, said, “There was a point where we even did all of our own shrink wrapping. Now, with a label, that’s taken care of, but we still have free reign and creative control.”

   The band’s members each have input and it’s those “five flavors,” as C-bass put it, that create the sound and energy that makes up “Critical Bill.”

   It’s the band’s smooth taste and determination that has enabled them to work with nationally recognized artists, including “Hed P.E.,” “Tantric,” “Tech N9ne” and “Drowning Pool,” just to name a few.

   “Critical Bill” is set to start their national tour shortly, but the band will be playing in Mt. Clemens on April 10, at Hayloft for “The Mardi Party.” For more information on the band, its members or upcoming shows visit http://www.critical-bill.com.

Valleys Climbs Mountains

“Valleys of Neptune” © Sony Music Entertainment
“Valleys of Neptune” © Sony Music Entertainment

Raymond Robinson

Managing Editor

To have the ability to say an artist is still able to please their fan base after being dead for over 40 years is amazing.

Jimi Hendrix’s “Valley’s of Neptune” brings from the vault a stellar package of songs, some alternate versions of old favorites & others never before commercially available.

The title track is maybe the most surprising of the entire group fusing all of the elements that Jimi has become so universally known for such as combining his unique blend of cords with styles of blues, jazz and rock.

“Valleys of Neptune” succeeds in showing that Hendrix hadn’t yet hit his creative peak at the time of his death and makes one wonder what surprises were left in this god of rock.

One gem on “Valleys of Neptune” is Jimi’s interpretation of Cream’s “Sunshine of Your Love.”

Most often when musicians cover other artists music you hear most of the same melody but, with Jimi’s interpretation he takes the Eric Clapton riff to a different place entirely as well as making it mostly instrumental which brings a new atmosphere to the well known classic.

Depending on where you purchase “Valley’s of Neptune” you can either get a shirt with the album cover artwork on it, or you can get two more tracks, so it’s up to the purchaser.

Jimi Hendrix is one of music’s iconic legends who continue to be cited as influences for many of today’s guitarists and this album succeeds in showing why this is true.

“Valleys of Neptune” would be a good addition to any music fans library and might over time become as relevant as his other iconic releases.

It can be summed up by saying that even if your star burns out, you will never truly fade away.

Critical still is catching “Critical Bill”

Cadi Parker

Staff Writer

Ever beat on your steering wheel; adrenaline surging through your veins?

Screamed at the top of your lungs?

Flat-out rocked out to a new album?

When music is intense and relatable, it heats you up and burns you down.

“Critical Bill” a “borderline rock/rap” band, according to their drummer, Mark Causley, hit the music scene hard Saturday, March 13.

The band played a sold out show at the Emerald Theatre in Mt. Clemens followed by an after party at The Hayloft, also in Mt. Clemens, to celebrate their new release.

Fans poured in to get their hands on “The Underground Kingdom,” which came free with a ticket stub.

“Hell Rides North,” “Lithium,” “Madonna Brothers” and “Stellardrive” served as fuel to the fire, creating an ever-growing sense of chaos for the nearly 2,000 rockers, partying hard, jamming out and moshing to guitar hard-ons.

“I like that I know what I’ll get, a good show” said George Wright, 25, Mt. Clemens. “I’ve been a fan for a while. I try to catch the ones I can.”

It’s been a long road for “Critical Bill,” cross-country touring several times, but they don’t mind the attention from the radio station or fans like Wright.

“We strive to move forward,” said Causley. “Our success is like a snow ball rolling downhill, we just keep getting larger and larger.”

“The Underground Kingdom” is their fifth album. The first three albums were put out by the band themselves. “There was a point where we even did all of our own shrink wrapping. Now, with a label, that’s taken care of and we still have free reign and creative control,” said lead vocalist, Powerdise.

Their “five flavors,” as Causley put it, create the sound that is “Critical Bill,” and has enabled them to work with national and noteworthy artists including “Hed P.E.,” “Tantric,” “Tech N9ne” and “Drowning Pool,” just to name a few.

Currently “Critical Bill” is touring, but the band will be back in Mt. Clemens on April 10, at The Hayloft. For more information on upcoming shows visit http://www.critical-bill.com.