Tag Archives: Campus Events

Student Government positions, up for grabs

The Student Government seat held by sophomore Dan Wiley will be open for election on April 7 and 8.
Photo by Brian Johnston; The Student Government seat held by sophomore Dan Wiley will be open for election on April 7 and 8.

Cody Kimball

Webmaster

You could be the next President of Student Government! Sound interesting? Petitions are available until in the Enrollment Services Office until March 26, when they are due back to Carrie Bearss by 4:30 p.m. To become a candidate, petitions must be signed by a minimum of 40 currently enrolled students.

The elections are scheduled for Wednesday, April 7, and Thursday, April 8 in the College Center Cafe’. Every SC4 student is able to vote, and run for office if they meet certain criteria.

To be a candidate for Student Government office, you must be enrolled for at least nine credit hours and have a minimum 2.0 grade point average.

“If you don’t have a 2.0 grade point average you have bigger problems than losing an election,” Dan Wiley, the current Student Government President joked.

Potentially, Wiley will be among the current Student Government officers that will not be running for re-election. Chuck King, the current Vice President, is running for next year’s Presidency, and may be the only current officer that will return next year.

King is among those petitioning for candidacy, and he says he knows of at least three others who are running for election.

“The most important thing is the voting dates,” said King, denoting the importance of student participation in the election process. Campaigning will begin on March 29, when students will be allowed to hang campaign signs around campus.

Student Government is a group that acts as the voice of the student body, in which every student can participate, that also helps coordinate student activities and events on campus.

Every position will be available, and officers will serve one-year terms, starting with spring semester and ending at the finish of winter semester, and officers are required to continue to maintain a 2.0 grade point average in at least nine credit hours to be remain in office.

The voting will take place on April 7 and April 8, from 9 a.m. till 1 p.m. and 5 p.m. till 6 p.m., in the College Center Cafe’. Voters must show identification.

For more information contact Carrie Bearss at 989-5501 or the Student Government office at 989-5737.

SC4 to Host Mock Trial

Patrick Sullivan

Staff Writer

Soon, on the SC4 campus, in front of numerous students, an alleged rape will be prosecuted. The crime is fiction, of course, and the lawyers, judge, and jury will be acting.

The mock trial will “raise awareness of sexual assault,” according to Student Government President Dan Wiley, but some students aren’t so sure.

“It’s a bad way to raise awareness of sexual assault,” said student Adam VanBlaricum. “But a good way to raise awareness of its consequences.”

“It sounds like a play,” adds Victoria Knowles, who doesn’t understand how it could raise awareness of rape.

The trial will take place on Tuesday, April 20 between 3:15 and 6:15 p.m. It will take place in the Fine Arts building theater, and attendance will be open to all students, free of charge.

The lawyers will argue their case before the jury deliberate on-stage and finally give a verdict. Both lawyers and judge are local representatives of their respective professions.

The 12 jury members, on the other hand, will be volunteers from the student body, and represent active clubs on campus.

Laughter really proves to be ‘best medicine’

Kayla Dimick

Staff Writer

“Ha ha ha ha!” was the sound resonating out of North Building room 107.

The “Health Benefits of Laughter” seminar was held Tuesday afternoon for SC4 students and staff alike. The SC4 Wellness Committee sponsored the free event.

Heading the event was Michigan Education Special Services Assocation (MESSA) health promotion consultant Mona Tropf.

Tropf started her career as a nurse, and has continued her profession for 18 years. She has been traveling around to different schools around the area for 5 years teaching about stress management, the science of weight loss and obesity, as well as the health benefits of laughter.

One thing Tropf made clear: the seminar would not be a lecture. The event was formatted like a workshop, with lots of interaction between Tropf and the participants.

The workshop focused on gelotology, which is the study of laughter. The subject is said to be centuries old, but there is still new information being researched and discovered at places like Texas A&M University and the University of Maryland.

As discussed in the workshop, laughter has many benefits to human’s physical and psychological health. It has been proven to relieve stress by suppressing stress hormones such as cortisol. Laughter has also been proven to trigger the release of endorphins, the body’s “feel good” hormone.

Laughter also stimulates many parts of the brain, one of them being the frontal lobe. This can play into slowing or even stopping the development of dementia and Alzheimer’s.

It was also revealed that hospitals are starting to use Humor Therapy for cancer patients and burn victims, using the concept of “mind over matter.”

While the mind can benefit immensely from laughter, so can the body. It has been proven that a good “belly laugh” does the same for your body as a 10 minute aerobic workout.

Laughing can also make you feel better as a whole, bring you out of a better mood and even help you find balance in life.

“With so much oppressing news out there it’s easy to get overwhelmed,” Tropf said. “If you can laugh, it puts things in perspective.”

Tropf stressed that making humor apart of daily life is essential. The key to this, Tropf said, is to set yourself up to be in a positive place. When you are in a positive mood, humor comes easily.

Chuck Meeker, an SC4 psychology instructor, took a lot of good information away from the seminar.

“You have to make and take time to laugh. She stressed that you have to make it part of your life,” Meeker said.

The main thing about laughter, Tropf said, is who you are with while laughing.

“Laughter is about relationships rather than the actual joke. Think about it, when do you have your best laughs? When you are with other people, loved ones, friends,” she said.

Government takes over airwaves

Photo by Cadi Parker The mic is open for Chuck King on Wednesdays at 10 a.m. for the Student Government’s radio show, broadcasted on WSGR, from SC4’s Fine Arts Building.
Photo by Cadi Parker; The mic is open for Chuck King on Wednesdays at 10 a.m. for the Student Government’s radio show, broadcasted on WSGR, from SC4’s Fine Arts Building.

Cadi Parker

Staff Writer

In the democracy, in which we live, it may come as a shock to hear that the government decided they needed airtime on WSGR, SC4’s radio station.

Some may wonder why and what for, but in this case, it is not local, state or federal government.

It is the Student Government.

According to Student Government Vice President, Chuck King, the timeslot allotted on Wednesday’s from 10 a.m. to11 a.m. now belongs to Student Government.

A snow day cancelled their first show, but the Student Government has since had five radio broadcasts.

According to King, Student Government’s airtime will include “interviews that will be conducted with advisors/ officers and students from clubs as well as possible faculty interviews in the future…perhaps one day even with Dr. Pollock.”

The radio show will also contain upcoming school events, information on clubs and will answer questions from emails to the Student Government, or questions from calls while on air.

As to who is the radio show’s personality, it’s Chuck King.

King’s epiphany attained much respect from his co-officers.

Paul Prax, Student Government Secretary, said, “I give him a lot of credit for thinking outside the box on this one, and expanding the Student Government’s horizon.”

It may seem like a new horizon now, but it’s not the first time for Student Government to have a radio show.

According to the WSGR’s Program Director, Dale Merrill, “The call letters SGR (in WSGR) represented Student Government Radio, in the ‘70’s, but in at least the past ten years there haven’t been any Student Government shows.”

Of course, SC4 students already possess various other ways to gain information. Each building is lined with bulletin boards and every student has their own email address linked to their school identification number.

Many, however, race by the news boards and rarely check their email.

One student, Kassie Piotrowski, 19, Goodells, she feels the SC4 email is “one of the most difficult emails to log into.” She also has “friends in radio, but has never tuned in”.

With the Student Government’s radio show hitting the air, Piotrowski feels that it would be more likely that she “would listen to (the radio) more often than checking her email. I just might start listening,” she said.

Culture club

Ray Robinson

Managing Editor

A celebration of Native American culture will take place on April 6 in the SC4 Fine Arts Theatre.

Registration starts at 8:30 a.m. and the event runs all day.

Morning and afternoon events include David Plain, author of “The Plains of Aamjiwnaang” and “Ways of Our Grandfathers: Our Tradition and Culture” discussing local history and culture.

Evening events include storytelling by Joan and Joe Jacobs who have been sharing their cultural history with local schools for the past 20 years.

There will also be a showcase of Native American customs performed by the Weengushk singing group and Niizh Dodem Dance Troup.

The event is sponsored in part by SC4’s Diversity Advisory Council and International Cultural Education Committee, and the St. Clair County Regional Educational Service Agency.

These events are free and open to the public

Paul Schmitt can be contacted for information regarding the day’s events by phone at 989-5573, or by e-mail at pjschmitt@sc4.edu.

Thinking Inside The Box

Photo by Cody Kimball; Carrie Bearss and Kevin Thurston inspect a prototype of the recycling containers during the first day of the construction project.
Photo by Cody Kimball; Carrie Bearss and Kevin Thurston inspect a prototype of the recycling containers during the first day of the construction project.

Cody Kimball

Web Master

   When, you’re finished reading this paper, don’t throw it away, recycle it. Is the nearest recycle bin too far away to bother? Not for long. Soon, permanent recycling receptacles will be all over campus, thanks to a “green” project at SC4.

   The recycle bins, built by students and staff at SC4, are the latest addition in a trend of green additions to the campus.

   “The college has recycled office waste for decades now, since the early ’90’s,” said Bob Hunckler, advisor of the Engineering Club, and a leader of the project. “This is the first time we’ve made it open for the students.”

   Students of all levels of construction experience were invited to participate in the construction of the recycle bins, throughout last week in the Acheson Technology Center.

   Those involved were assigned one of four stations to build various components of the bins, in a sort of assembly line. The materials to build the four components: tops; walls; doors and backs, were pre-cut to be identical sizes to ease construction.

   “Sort of an easy jigsaw puzzle,” as Hunckler put it.

   The receptacles are built out of decking materials, made of recycled plastics. The decking materials are durable, even in the elements, and these boxes are intended to be used indoors. So they are expected to be on campus for years, even decades, to come.

   Each box will have two containers on the inside, separating bottles, such as water and soda bottles, from papers, like unwanted homework, and the print you’re holding now.

   “They’re not for material from your homes, but materials that are on campus: plastic bottles and such,” Hunckler said through his dust mask during the construction of a piece of assembly equipment.

   Even the construction of the containers was done with the environment in mind. Tool boxes and part containers were fashioned out of juice jugs and other recyclable items. “Reuse and then recycle!” Hunckler stated.

   The project was sponsored by the Student Government, and managed by members of the SC4 Green Team, comprised faculty, students and staff, in the interests of promoting an eco-friendly campus environment, and college pride, through a bit of “sweat-equity.”

   On the first day of the project, members of many different student organizations were represented at the construction. Officers of Student Government, like Frank Scarber and Chuck King, (along with the help of his daughter, Cassie King) helped construct doors, walls and tops to the bins.

   Twana Pinskey, a member of Phi Theta Kappa, the Zombie Defense Council, and the Erie Square Gazette helped build doors. Students from virtually every club and background were represented in the effort. Even Carrie Bearss, SC4’s Student Activities Coordinator, pitched in, helping the process of building.

   “This is what the college needs to do,” said Hunckler, whose family members, including his daughter Katie, had come to assist with the project. “It’s part of our society now.”

   Upon completion, the recycle bins will be placed in areas to service the entire campus, as another step toward a greener cleaner environment.

Laughing Gass Saves Lives

Patricia Kenner

Staff Writer

   On Thursday, Feb. 25, there was a benefit held to raise money for Haiti. The benefit was held by SC4’s Lambda Mu Chapter of Phi Theta Kappa Honor International Society, Global Awareness Club and Social Science Department.

   First, there was a free lecture about Haiti presented by Professor Kraig Archer and then an hour after the lecture was the improv comedy group Laughing Gass.

   The comedy show was 5 dollars for students and 7 dollars for the public. The money raised was donated through the Clinton Bush Haiti fund.

   Professor Archer’s lecture was about the earthquake, how this earthquake compared with other earthquakes in different countries, and how Haiti needs both short term and long term aid.

   What Archer meant by Haiti needing both short and long term aid is the short term aid will help for right now, but they need aid in the long term to make sure that the country is getting prosperous. This benefit would be considered short term aid for Haiti.

   The show was made up of a bunch of different skits. The group interacted with the audience and one skit that had many cracking up. After the show the feedback from the audience was evident. Elizabeth Burgess, Port Huron, said, “I enjoyed it a lot. I thought it was a good way to raise funds. It was better than doing a pop can drive or fundraiser.”

   Laughing Gass has four members. They are Christine Day, Brian Day, Marty Snarski and Craig Martin. They have been together since 2004.

   This was not their first benefit. They did a show similar like this back in 2004 when the tsunami happened. The group likes doing benefits like this because they get to raise money and bring laughter during tragedy.

   Brian Day said, “We do improv and something good for society. It is one of the few things that theater can do to give back to society.”

   If interested in the Global Awareness club, call Kraig Archer at 810-989-5695.

SC4 puts cigarettes out

Brian Johnston

Editor in Chief

   Smokers at SC4 will soon face new rules which move the designated smoking areas even further away from where they’re used to smoking.

   In a policy adopted on Feb. 18, the Board of Trustees “recognizes the health dangers created by smoking and hereby prohibits smoking in all College Buildings and vehicles.”

   The policy bans smoking on campus within 20 feet of any entrance or exit, and “areas of the campus where non-smokers cannot avoid exposure to smoke.”

   Smoking would also be prohibited where it might come into buildings through “entrances, windows, ventilation systems or by any other means.”

   SC4 President Dr. Kevin Pollock said that SC4 is also adding “the correct signage and smoking receptacles” to make students aware of the new policy, “in the hopes of promoting better health.”

   In addition to second-hand smoke, the Board of Trustees also addressed the litter situation on campus, with the growing number of cigarette butts being a key issue.

   Dr. Pollock said students could help simply by making sure that cigarette butts were extinguished in proper receptacles.

   “Rather than a total smoking ban, this is providing an opportunity for our students and staff to make campus a little cleaner and healthier,” said Pollock.

Government takes over airwaves

Cadi Parker

Staff Writer

   In the democracy in which we live, it may come as a shock to hear that the government decided they needed airtime on WSGR, SC4’s radio station.

   Some may wonder why and what for, but in this case, it is not local, state or federal government.

   It is the Student Government.

   According to an email from Student Government Vice President, Chuck King, 50, Port Huron, the timeslot allotted on Wednesday’s from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. was given to the Student Government a few weeks back.

   A snow day caused their first show to be cancelled but the Student Government has since had three radio broadcasts.

   Their airtime will include “interviews that will be conducted with advisors/ officers and students from clubs as well as possible faculty interviews in the future…perhaps one day even with Dr. Pollock,” said King.

   The Student Government radio show will include upcoming school events, information on clubs, and will answer questions from emails to the Student Government, or even answer questions and concerns live on air.

   As to who is the radio show’s personality, it’s Chuck King.

   “I give him a lot of credit for thinking outside the box on this one, and expanding the Student Government’s horizon,” said Paul Prax, Student Government Secretary, 20, Fort Gratiot, referring to King’s idea of creating a radio show to enlighten the student body.

   Dale Merrill, 43, Port Huron, is WSGR’s Program Director. According to Merrill, “The call letters SGR (in WSGR) represented Student Government Radio, in the ‘70’s, but in at least the past ten years there haven’t been any Student Government shows.”

   Of course, there are various other ways to gain information as a SC4 student. Each building is lined with bulletin boards and every student has their own email address linked to their school identification.

   Many students, however, race by the news boards and rarely check their email, like student Kassie Piotrowski, 19, Goodells. She feels the SC4 email is “one of the most difficult emails to log into.” She also has “friends in radio, but has never tuned in”.

   With the Student Government’s radio show hitting the air, Piotrowski feels that it would be more likely that she would listen to the radio more often than checking her email. “I just might start listening,” she said.

   Piotrowski is not alone. If information is needed on events and activities on campus, tune into 91.3 on Wednesday mornings from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. For school updates, it’s another “good idea.”

Clubbin’

Photo by Aaron Tomlinson; Two students talk with Zombie Defense Council members, left to right: Jeremy Case; Nigel Elliot; Cody Kimball.
Photo by Aaron Tomlinson; Two students talk with Zombie Defense Council members, left to right: Jeremy Case; Nigel Elliott; Cody Kimball.

Aaron Tomlinson

Copy Editor

   During the week of Feb 22, SC4 students in the cafeteria were greeted by representatives from different college clubs.

   Club Awareness Week had clubs on the search for new and interested students. From Phi Theta Kappa, to the Drama Club, to even the new Zombie Defense Council; clubs were prepared to advertise their interests before students.

   “Club Awareness Week is an opportunity for clubs to advertise what they are about to students,” Student Government secretary Paul Prax, said. “It is more of giving the students an option to join instead of recruiting.”

   Each day had a designated two or three clubs around lunchtime to show off what their club was about. Not only was it a benefit for unsure students to join, but also an opportunity for newer clubs to reveal themselves officially to the public.

   Two new clubs on campus are the Gay Straight Alliance and the Zombie Defense Council. Both clubs plan to launch themselves into the melting pot of student-campus interaction.

   “Our goal for the year, aside from fortifying our defenses against the impending zombie apocalypse, is to have students gather and speak freely about zombie concerns,” said Bob Kroll, faculty adviser for the Zombie Defense Council.

   The Zombie Defense Council plans on having a screening of “Night of the Living Dead,” as well as filming their own movies.

   The Gay Straight Alliance also intends for the students to become aware of who they are.

   “We are trying to bring out gay awareness,” said Sean Lathrop, treasurer of the Gay Straight Alliance. “We want to inform students of events that focus on the gay community. We aren’t the gay club; we encourage any student to join, whether gay or straight.”

   The Gay Straight Alliance plans on hosting a ping pong tournament on campus, as well as theatrical shows in the future.

   While the newer clubs are taking a leap into the pool, many clubs are already swimming.

   “The Student Government acts as the formal spokesperson for the college students,” said Dan Wiley, Student Government President. “We have many activities throughout the year like stress breakers, raffle drawings, candy giveaways and we are always interested in newer ideas.”

   The cafeteria filled with relieved students on break could sense the lyrics of Yung Joc through the club members’ mouths: “Meet me in the club, it’s goin’ down. Anywhere you meet me guaranteed to go down.”