Tag Archives: Cadi Parker

Filling empty bowls

Cadi Parker

Staff Writer

Bowls made by SC4’s clay students, ready to serve as reminders for the cause, awaiting selection at the dinner, March 25. Photo by Cadi Parker
Bowls made by SC4’s clay students, ready to serve as reminders for the cause, awaiting selection at the dinner, March 25. Photo by Cadi Parker

 

   Across the world there are many that stay hungry throughout the day, or may just not know if they will have at least one meal to eat come next sunrise.

   “Empty Bowls” is part of an International awareness campaign to recognize and help deplete hunger across the world.

   A local effort began in Port Huron seven years ago, and has been more successful in providing food for our locals each year.

   This year’s “Empty Bowls” dinner drew hundreds of charitable and hungry area residents to St. Stephen’s Parish Hall of Port Huron on March 25.

   The 2010 “Empty Bowl” dinner benefit had zero overhead and drew in well over 300 guests, according to Eileen Jay, who served as an artist liaison and volunteer for the event.

   The Parish was packed, guests filled every table.

   Event Co-Coordinator, Terry Krueger said, “Every year this gets to be bigger and bigger, people sit down, eat and stay to talk and mingle with others. I just don’t know where I’m going to put them all.”

   The hundreds of attendees were able to choose from multiple types of soup and chili and take home their own “empty bowl” created by area artists and students from all levels of education, including our college.

   Rachelle Heydens, 20, a SC4 student, donated her first bowl at this year’s event. Heydens was unable to attend the event, but said, “I had never heard of empty bowls before, until my clay class. I felt good that I was making and giving something up, that will someday help someone.” Heydens also wishes she could have made more to donate.

   The proceeds from donations and a silent auction held at the event increased more than 10% from the previous year will help provide the Mid-City Nutrition Program with funds for its soup kitchen.

   The final tally is not exact, but according to Jay, “this year has been the best year ever for attendance, for the number of bowls donated and for the success of the silent auction.” Totals are expected to exceed 13,000 dollars.

   Jay also said, “This community has such a heart. For people to turn out like they did, and give so generously, the dinner was a fabulous success.”

Critical still is catching Critical Bill

Cadi Parker

Staff Writer

 Ever beat on your steering wheel, adrenaline surging through your veins?

   Screamed at the top of your lungs?

   Flat-out rocked out to a new album?

   When music is intense and relatable, it’ll heat you up and burn you down.

   “Critical Bill,” a self proclaimed borderline rock/rap band, hit the music scene hard, Saturday, March 13. The band played a sold out show at the Emerald Theatre in Mt. Clemens followed by an after party at Hayloft, also in Mt. Clemens, to celebrate their new release, “The Underground Kingdom.”

   The line-up, “Hell Rides North,” “Lithium,” “Madonna Brothers” and “Stellardrive,” served as fuel to the fire, creating an ever-growing sense of chaos for the packed house. Fans partied hard, jammed out and moshed to guitar hard-ons.

   For some rockers, it was their first “Critical” show, but others were familiar with the electric energy put out by the band, like fan George Wright.

   “I like that I know I’ll get, a good show,” said Wright, 25, Mt. Clemens. “I’ve been a fan for a while. I try to catch the ones I can.”

   It’s been a long road for “Critical Bill,” cross-country touring several times, but they don’t mind the attention from radio stations or fans like Wright.

   “We strive to move forward,” said the band’s drummer, known as C-bass. “Our success is like a snow ball rolling downhill, we just keep getting larger and larger.”

   “The Underground Kingdom” is their fifth album. The first three albums were put out by the band themselves. Powerdise, the band’s lead vocalist, said, “There was a point where we even did all of our own shrink wrapping. Now, with a label, that’s taken care of, but we still have free reign and creative control.”

   The band’s members each have input and it’s those “five flavors,” as C-bass put it, that create the sound and energy that makes up “Critical Bill.”

   It’s the band’s smooth taste and determination that has enabled them to work with nationally recognized artists, including “Hed P.E.,” “Tantric,” “Tech N9ne” and “Drowning Pool,” just to name a few.

   “Critical Bill” is set to start their national tour shortly, but the band will be playing in Mt. Clemens on April 10, at Hayloft for “The Mardi Party.” For more information on the band, its members or upcoming shows visit http://www.critical-bill.com.

Critical still is catching “Critical Bill”

Cadi Parker

Staff Writer

Ever beat on your steering wheel; adrenaline surging through your veins?

Screamed at the top of your lungs?

Flat-out rocked out to a new album?

When music is intense and relatable, it heats you up and burns you down.

“Critical Bill” a “borderline rock/rap” band, according to their drummer, Mark Causley, hit the music scene hard Saturday, March 13.

The band played a sold out show at the Emerald Theatre in Mt. Clemens followed by an after party at The Hayloft, also in Mt. Clemens, to celebrate their new release.

Fans poured in to get their hands on “The Underground Kingdom,” which came free with a ticket stub.

“Hell Rides North,” “Lithium,” “Madonna Brothers” and “Stellardrive” served as fuel to the fire, creating an ever-growing sense of chaos for the nearly 2,000 rockers, partying hard, jamming out and moshing to guitar hard-ons.

“I like that I know what I’ll get, a good show” said George Wright, 25, Mt. Clemens. “I’ve been a fan for a while. I try to catch the ones I can.”

It’s been a long road for “Critical Bill,” cross-country touring several times, but they don’t mind the attention from the radio station or fans like Wright.

“We strive to move forward,” said Causley. “Our success is like a snow ball rolling downhill, we just keep getting larger and larger.”

“The Underground Kingdom” is their fifth album. The first three albums were put out by the band themselves. “There was a point where we even did all of our own shrink wrapping. Now, with a label, that’s taken care of and we still have free reign and creative control,” said lead vocalist, Powerdise.

Their “five flavors,” as Causley put it, create the sound that is “Critical Bill,” and has enabled them to work with national and noteworthy artists including “Hed P.E.,” “Tantric,” “Tech N9ne” and “Drowning Pool,” just to name a few.

Currently “Critical Bill” is touring, but the band will be back in Mt. Clemens on April 10, at The Hayloft. For more information on upcoming shows visit http://www.critical-bill.com.

From the heart

Photo by Cadi Parker; Students’ bowls are shown off by Jason Stier, Riverview East’s art teacher, for Eileen Jay (right), artist liaison for the International Empty Bowls Event, early Monday morning.
Photo by Cadi Parker; Students’ bowls are shown off by Jason Stier, Riverview East’s art teacher, for Eileen Jay (right), artist liaison for the International Empty Bowls Event, early Monday morning.

Cadi Parker

Staff Writer

Many struggle weekly to keep food on the table.

Some may feel lucky to have just one meal a day.

Even within our community many go hungry to feed their children, or perhaps their children stay hungry, too. This need for nourishment is worldwide, but there is a way to help.

Port Huron is having its seventh annual International Empty Bowl Event today.

For $25 anyone can come eat, and choose a bowl to take home to remember the event, and the reason that the benefit exists.

The dinner will be held at St. Stephens Catholic Church Parish Hall located at 325 32nd Street in Port Huron. The event begins at 4:30 p.m. and will last until 7 p.m.

Featured at the event will be a silent auction and a chance to meet some of the artists and students that worked hard to come up with nearly 300 “empty bowls” for each guest that attends the dinner.

Eileen Jay, artist liaison, said, “This year the event has been moved to St. Stephen’s to accommodate for the event’s growth.”

“Last year, the event brought in $11,500, and that was in a recession,” said, Jay.

This year’s hopes are high for the amount of money raised and there will also be “no overhead; everything has been donated and everyone is serving as volunteers.”

Every penny will go directly to the Mid-City Nutrition Program and their soup kitchen artists and students alike were all volunteers.

Many local artists donated their time, as well as their own pieces, to schools to teach children different methods of making bowls for the event. Jason Stier, a Riverview East (St. Clair) art teacher, said, “Having Mark Harris visit helped take the intimidation away from throwing on the wheel.” This time taken by artists helps students to learn and create art for a cause.

High school students aren’t the only ones donating. The Montessori Children’s Academy in St. Clair is also providing bowls created by students with the help of other artists.

Celeste Skalnek, SC4’s ceramics/pottery teacher, also encouraged her students to create works of art for the “Empty Bowls dinners.” She said, “I have always done bowls.” Skalnek has even been talking up the event “since the first day of class.”

Last year, the Soup Kitchen provided 54,906 meals to homeless or hungry locals, but the International Empty Bowl event should help take the heat for much of the expenses.

Government takes over airwaves

Photo by Cadi Parker The mic is open for Chuck King on Wednesdays at 10 a.m. for the Student Government’s radio show, broadcasted on WSGR, from SC4’s Fine Arts Building.
Photo by Cadi Parker; The mic is open for Chuck King on Wednesdays at 10 a.m. for the Student Government’s radio show, broadcasted on WSGR, from SC4’s Fine Arts Building.

Cadi Parker

Staff Writer

In the democracy, in which we live, it may come as a shock to hear that the government decided they needed airtime on WSGR, SC4’s radio station.

Some may wonder why and what for, but in this case, it is not local, state or federal government.

It is the Student Government.

According to Student Government Vice President, Chuck King, the timeslot allotted on Wednesday’s from 10 a.m. to11 a.m. now belongs to Student Government.

A snow day cancelled their first show, but the Student Government has since had five radio broadcasts.

According to King, Student Government’s airtime will include “interviews that will be conducted with advisors/ officers and students from clubs as well as possible faculty interviews in the future…perhaps one day even with Dr. Pollock.”

The radio show will also contain upcoming school events, information on clubs and will answer questions from emails to the Student Government, or questions from calls while on air.

As to who is the radio show’s personality, it’s Chuck King.

King’s epiphany attained much respect from his co-officers.

Paul Prax, Student Government Secretary, said, “I give him a lot of credit for thinking outside the box on this one, and expanding the Student Government’s horizon.”

It may seem like a new horizon now, but it’s not the first time for Student Government to have a radio show.

According to the WSGR’s Program Director, Dale Merrill, “The call letters SGR (in WSGR) represented Student Government Radio, in the ‘70’s, but in at least the past ten years there haven’t been any Student Government shows.”

Of course, SC4 students already possess various other ways to gain information. Each building is lined with bulletin boards and every student has their own email address linked to their school identification number.

Many, however, race by the news boards and rarely check their email.

One student, Kassie Piotrowski, 19, Goodells, she feels the SC4 email is “one of the most difficult emails to log into.” She also has “friends in radio, but has never tuned in”.

With the Student Government’s radio show hitting the air, Piotrowski feels that it would be more likely that she “would listen to (the radio) more often than checking her email. I just might start listening,” she said.

Government takes over airwaves

Cadi Parker

Staff Writer

   In the democracy in which we live, it may come as a shock to hear that the government decided they needed airtime on WSGR, SC4’s radio station.

   Some may wonder why and what for, but in this case, it is not local, state or federal government.

   It is the Student Government.

   According to an email from Student Government Vice President, Chuck King, 50, Port Huron, the timeslot allotted on Wednesday’s from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. was given to the Student Government a few weeks back.

   A snow day caused their first show to be cancelled but the Student Government has since had three radio broadcasts.

   Their airtime will include “interviews that will be conducted with advisors/ officers and students from clubs as well as possible faculty interviews in the future…perhaps one day even with Dr. Pollock,” said King.

   The Student Government radio show will include upcoming school events, information on clubs, and will answer questions from emails to the Student Government, or even answer questions and concerns live on air.

   As to who is the radio show’s personality, it’s Chuck King.

   “I give him a lot of credit for thinking outside the box on this one, and expanding the Student Government’s horizon,” said Paul Prax, Student Government Secretary, 20, Fort Gratiot, referring to King’s idea of creating a radio show to enlighten the student body.

   Dale Merrill, 43, Port Huron, is WSGR’s Program Director. According to Merrill, “The call letters SGR (in WSGR) represented Student Government Radio, in the ‘70’s, but in at least the past ten years there haven’t been any Student Government shows.”

   Of course, there are various other ways to gain information as a SC4 student. Each building is lined with bulletin boards and every student has their own email address linked to their school identification.

   Many students, however, race by the news boards and rarely check their email, like student Kassie Piotrowski, 19, Goodells. She feels the SC4 email is “one of the most difficult emails to log into.” She also has “friends in radio, but has never tuned in”.

   With the Student Government’s radio show hitting the air, Piotrowski feels that it would be more likely that she would listen to the radio more often than checking her email. “I just might start listening,” she said.

   Piotrowski is not alone. If information is needed on events and activities on campus, tune into 91.3 on Wednesday mornings from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. For school updates, it’s another “good idea.”

Tuba Fascination

Dale Harris played the tuba for a packed crowd in the Fine Arts Theatre at SC4 on Thursday, Jan. 28. The concert at noon on Thursday was accurately entitled, Tuba Fascination, and by the end of concert the audience was on the edge of their seats.
Lillian Maley, SC4’s artistic director described Harris as “a humble man”. He pleased the crowd with short stories that his wife informed him to leave out, giving a bit of humor to the performance.
Harris played songs like “Rocked in the Cradle of the Deep” by E. DeLamater and “Emmett’s Lullaby” by G.E. Holmes, featuring Marcia Collins on the piano. Harris also played “The Surf Polka” by F. Steinhauser, which earned him his first win at a local talent show decades ago.
The audience received a great value for the free Thursday at noon concert.
One audience member, Marion Abern, 54, out of Casco Township said, “I thought the performance was great. I’m impressed with his love for the tuba and performing.”
Another satisfied guest, Gloria Atcheson, said, “I enjoyed the last song the most. It was quite comical. Never did I think I would enjoy the show so much.”
That last song Harris played was “Irish Washerwoman” by J. Dugan. The 70 year-old tuba player attempted to blow out a light bulb after 97 straight notes. The bulb was a stand in for a candle, humorous and none the less fascinating.
Dale Harris has been pleasing ears for years, and says he has no reason to retire.
Thursday noon concerts are free and open to the public. For more information or reservations for lunch after concert series’ events please call: 1(810) 989-5709 between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m. Monday through Friday.

One dollar. No, two dollars.

Students returning to school this January had quite the surprise when paying to park in the South McMorran lot. Previously, the price to park on the South lot was a single dollar, but as of Jan. 1, the price has doubled.
The students may have gotten a surprise but the school knew of the price increase ahead of time, according to McMorran’s General Manager Randy Fernandez.
The reason for the increase is to lower McMorran’s running cost; the subsidy they’ve been receiving is in the process of being lowered. “The city has asked myself and the board to reduce operating costs and one of the ways we can do this is parking,” Fernandez said.
SC4 student Amanda Hartfil, 23 of Croswell, parks on the South lot. She was surprised. “I saw it, but everything is going up these days, isn’t it. I’ll still occasionally park here, on my long days” she said.
Whether parking in the school’s lot, which is free and frequently full, or on one of the McMorran lots… a student does have options.
Mary May, 79 of Port Huron, works for McMorran in the guard booth at the South lot. She said, “Many are surprised (about the increase), and question the price, because the North lot is still one dollar.” Just remember to bring your school id or backpack to receive the discount. May also said, “Some days are busier than others, but at night kids still like to park here because they feel safer.”
McMorran also offers parking booklets for 25 dollars which contain 40 passes. Permanent passes can be obtained at the office inside McMorran and are 250 dollars for the South lot, and 120 dollars for the North lot according to Fernandez.
It may cost an extra dollar to park in the South lot, but it is convenient, and what may cost an extra dollar now could be saving pennies upon pennies of tax money.