Tag Archives: 57-13

A century of being prepared

This vintage Boy Scout handbook and plaque are among the many scouting memorabilia exhibits on display at the Port Huron Museum through April 25. Photos by: Twana Pinskey
This vintage Boy Scout handbook and plaque are among the many scouting memorabilia exhibits on display at the Port Huron Museum through April 25. Photos by: Twana Pinskey

Twana Pinskey

Photo Editor    

   Boy Scouts of America website states that boy scouts was founded to help young people attain skills necessary to become responsible, well rounded citizens.

Founded in 1910, the scouts celebrate their 100th anniversary this year.

  Port Huron Museum, in collaboration with Blue Water council of Boy Scouts of America, opened the “Celebrating 100 years of Scouting” exhibit at the Main Museum in Port Huron Feb 6th and will continue the exhibit through April 25.

   According to the “Scout-o-rama” web site, there are many celebrities who are former scouts: Walter Cronkite, journalist, television anchor; movie mogul, Steven Spielberg; Henry Hank Aaron, baseball player; Bruce Jenner, Olympic Gold Medalist; Mark Spitz, Olympic swimming gold medalist.

   SC4’s President, Dr. Kevin Pollock, is an Eagle Scout having attained this status on March 25, 1973 with troop 368 in Grand Blanc, Michigan. “It gave me a lot of opportunity to see things from different perspectives,” said Dr. Pollock. According to Pollock, the Eagle Scout ceremony and going to Camp Tapico in Grayling, Michigan were among his favorite memories of scouting.

   According to the museum’s Web site, the exhibit was designed by their curator of exhibits and collections, Suzette Brombley. “Most of the material used to build this exhibit was donated,” explained Brombley.

   The history of scouting in America is shown through exhibits such as photographs, old uniforms, patches, personal recollections of former scouts, hands on activities such as knot tying and practicing firearms skills with a laser simulator.

   According to Holly Madock, museum manager of volunteers, in addition to this variety of activities, groups can schedule an overnight stay as part of the scouting experience.

   “It went really well when we did our last overnight stay,” said Madock. She explained another overnight is being planned for April 16. Adults are required to stay with the overnighters.

   Other scouting activities offered at the museum include identification of animal tracks, and “secrets of the pinewood derby.”

   Museum hours are 11 a.m. through 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday. Further information on this exhibit can be obtained by calling the museum at:  810-982-0891.

Keepin’ it real

Mallorie Krul as Annie and Owen McIntyre as Henry, on stage in SC4 Theatre Discipline’s production of “The Real Thing.” Photo by Kaya Dimick
Mallorie Krul as Annie and Owen McIntyre as Henry, on stage in SC4 Theatre Discipline’s production of “The Real Thing.” Photo by Kaya Dimick

Kayla Dimick

Staff Writer

    The stage lights weren’t the only things that shone brightly as the SC4 Theatre Discipline presented their latest show, “The Real Thing.”

   Students, friends and family members packed into the Fine Arts Building Theatre the weekend of Friday, March 26 to see the comedic, yet serious take on “real life.”

   Written by Tom Stoppard, “The Real Thing” spins an intricate web involving love, infidelity, art and politics.

   Set in London in the 1980’s, the play examines the lives of Henry, a playwright, played by Owen McIntyre; Annie, an actress and activist, played by Mallorie Krul; Max, an actor, played by Dan Williams; Charlotte, an actress, played by Ashley Szymanski; Billy, an actor, played by A.J. Rank; Debbie, Charlotte and Henry’s daughter, played by Kami Misch; and Brodie, an imprisoned Scottish soldier, played by Jeremy Antilla.

   Stoppard provides an interesting view on life, paralleling what the audience sees as truth and what is the actual truth, using the “play-within-a-play” mentality.

   For example, the first scene is what the audience believes to be an argument about infidelity between characters Charlotte and Max, only to discover later they were actually performing in a play written by Henry. 

   While “the Real Thing” challenged the audience’s perception on reality, it also seemed to please.

   “I thought it was a great show,” SC4 freshman Zach Parkhurst said. “Many of the characters were very well done.”

   Although the actors may have made it look easy, portraying someone vastly different from oneself can prove to be quite challenging, according to director and adjunct instructor Tom Kephart.

   “A big challenge for any actor is getting familiar with their character, a task that’s made especially difficult when there are age and life experience differences. This was true of nearly all the characters in ‘The Real Thing’,” Kephart said. “It wasn’t easy, but the cast was up to the challenge and was wiling to work hard and stretch themselves as actors to make their characters believable, even if not always likeable.”

   Stepping up to “The Real Thing’s” challenge was SC4 sophomore and general education major Mallorie Krul, who played Annie.

   “‘The Real Thing’ was probably the hardest play I’ve ever been in. Annie was very different than any of the roles I’ve had,” Krul said. “Most of the roles I’ve had are people my age or maybe younger.”

   In order to cope with the differences, Krul said she had some help from Kephart, as well as tried to get to know her character inside and out.

   “I just tried to put myself in Annie’s shoes and tried to do things the way I thought she would do them,” Krul said.

   If you missed the Real Thing, you can catch the SC4 Theatre Disipline’s next production, “Young King Arthur” by Clive Endersby at 2 p.m., Saturday, May 15 in the SC4 Fine Arts Theatre.