Category Archives: New News

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November is epilepsy awareness month

November is epilepsy awareness month

Amber Oile

Staff Writer

 

Purple is such a meaningful color in the month of November.

Many of us celebrate Veterans Day in this month and honor our Purple Heart solders, but did you know purple is also the color used to recognize and spread awareness about the 65 million people worldwide affected by epilepsy?

On Nov. 14, Janice Kelly, Vice President of Phi Theta Kappa Fellowship, came together with Dan Martiny, President of Alumni Association, in the College Center Café for their event for epilepsy awareness.

They teamed up with students from Blue Water Cosmetology and handed out information for students, informing them of the many effects of epilepsy.

Megan Langolf, certified nurse’s aid and student of Blue Water Cosmetology, added purple extensions and also shared a bit of history about her experience with the epilepsy syndrome.

When asked what about the significance of purple hair extensions, student Pamela Hulett informed, “It symbolizes epilepsy awareness and gives many students willing to contribute a chance, by donation, to help raise money towards this cause.”

Langolf spoke about a time she witnessed a seizure and how having experience in the medical field assisted her in handling the situation properly.

“I worked at a group home and had a client fall onto the floor tile. I had to remain calm, clear the area and secure his head to make sure he did not receive any head injuries during this seizure. it was a very scary situation,” said Langolf.

These millions of men and woman suffering from uncontrolled seizures live in a world that is part their own, and part dictated by this syndrome. At any moment they could lose control of their bodies, thus limiting them from the ability to drive, and ultimately forcing them to be restricted from certain ways of living.

Kelly, also a victim of epilepsy syndrome, admits there are some drawbacks, but that she doesn’t let this syndrome slow her down in any sense of the word.

“I’m living with epilepsy and I don’t allow it to prevent me from working my hardest,” said Kelly. This year being her last year in school, she will have her degree in early childhood education.

Kelly dedicated the event and her success to a close friend who also suffered from epilepsy syndrome. Her friend went to Henry Ford Community College and passed away in 2011 from having a severe seizure. Her friend is deeply missed and has been an inspiration for her to push forward and spread awareness any way possible.

 

Blue Water Art Hop brings to you fine art

Blue Water Art Hop brings to you fine art

Amber Oile

Staff Writer

 

Blue Water Art Hop brings you fine art.

On Nov. 2 Port Huron hosted the Blue Water Art Hop.

The Art Hop originated in Grand Rapids and made its way to Port Huron after its success in the town.  Participating businesses filled wall to wall with people means another successful night for Blue Water.

Partnering together with downtown Port Huron’s local businesses, over twenty artists from all over the state displayed their art.

St. Clair County Community College jump started the event with artwork from local artist Jason Stier. The eye catching display had many passersby engaged in the artist’s work and ready to see more.

Port Huron High School students stopped over to take pictures for a tech class, and others to gain inspiration for personal interest in art.

Mosher’s Jewelry joined together with Sarah Allen, displaying her colorful and sculpted canvases. The combination of these two left viewers in awe.

Kate’s Downtown showed art work by siblings Mary Jo Boughton and Cindy Lindow. The Detroit natives showed their love for their hometown with pieces from old abandoned Catholic churches by Lindow, and photos from the Detroit Zoo by Boughton.

“Their photography was thrilling for the eyeballs,” said Port Huron native, Sebastian Radall.

The entire downtown filled with art from top to bottom, showing the culture of our city and other cities combined left a lasting impression on our natives.

Thinking outside the book: Students divided on loose-leaf text books

Thinking outside the book:

Students divided on loose-leaf text books

Joyce Smith

Staff Writer

“We will not be buying back any loose-leaf texts,” said Amanda Belliveau, from the SC4 bookstore.

This will come as quite a surprise to some on the SC4 campus, and is sure to add to the complaints about this format for textbooks.

Students have described them with words like “garbage,” “junk,” and other adjectives that allude to the overall poor quality of the product.

“You are buying a shrink wrapped bundle of paper,” stated one student who did not wish to have their name mentioned.  The same student went on to state that this bundle of papers costs $150+, that it is poor quality paper that rips easily, you must buy a binder to hold the chapters, and that the loose-leaf book has no resale value.

“I like the loose-leaf books,” commented Pam Gregg, an SC4 freshman, from Avoca. “They are made specifically for SC4 and they don’t a have a bunch of stuff we don’t need or use. I like the fact that I can take out only the chapters, or pages, with which I am working so that I don’t have to keep flipping back and forth through a whole bunch of pages.”

Gregg pulled out a soft-cover text book and showed the curling cover, and the binding that was coming unglued, “At least with the loose-leaf books I can buy a binder and protect the pages from ripping, and curling.”

Student experience with this new format for text books on this campus is somewhat limited, with only a small number of courses utilizing loose-leaf books at this time.

In the past, unless the textbook should change for the next semester, there was always a strong market for textbooks in buy-back programs through the school and through outside companies who purchase used textbooks for resale at very competitive prices.

Loose-leaf books will offer students quite a surprise at the end of this semester; no buy-back value.

However, one industrious student stated, “The school may not be buying them back, but that isn’t going to stop me from selling them to someone on campus myself!”

Men’s and Women’s basketball schedules

Men’s and Women’s basketball schedules

Men’s home games:

  • Wednesday, Nov. 7 @7:30 p.m. against Concordia University JV
  • Tuesday, Nov. 13 @ 7:30 p.m. against Lambton College
  • Friday, Dec. 7 @ 7:30 p.m. against Lakeland Community College
  • Saturday, Dec. 15 @ 3 p.m. against Rochester College
  • Saturday, Jan. 5@ 3 p.m. against Kirtland Community College
  • Monday, Jan. 7 @ 7:30 p.m. against Alpena Community College
  • Wednesday, Jan. 16 @ 7:30 p.m. against Mott Community College
  • Saturday, Jan. 26 @ 3 p.m. against Henry Ford Community College
  • Wednesday, Jan. 30 @ 7:30 p.m. against Macomb Community College
  • Wednesday, Feb. 6 @ 7:30 p.m. against Wayne County Community College District
  • Saturday, Feb. 9 @ 3 p.m. against Oakland Community College
  • Saturday, Feb. 16 @ 3 p.m. against Delta College
  • Wednesday, Feb. 20 @ 7:30 p.m. against Schoolcraft College

 

Women’s Home Games:

  • Thursday, Nov. 8 @ 7 p.m. against Rochester College Junior Varsity
  • Tuesday, Nov. 13 @ 5:30 p.m. against Lambton College
  • Tuesday, Nov. 20 @ 7 p.m. against Lansing Community College
  • Friday, Dec. 7 @ 5:30 p.m. against Lakeland Community College
  • Saturday, Dec. 15 @ 1 p.m. against Kellogg Community College
  • Saturday, Jan. 5 @ 1 p.m. against Kirtland Community College
  • Monday, Jan. 7 @ 5:30 p.m. against Alpena Community College
  • Wednesday, Jan. 16 @ 5:30 p.m. against Mott Community College
  • Saturday, Jan. 26 @ 1 p.m. against Henry Ford Community College
  • Wednesday, Jan. 30 @ 5:30 p.m. against Macomb Community College
  • Wednesday, Feb. 6 @ 5:30 p.m. against Wayne County Community College District
  • Saturday, Feb. 9 @ 1 p.m. against Oakland Community College
  • Saturday, Feb. 16 @ 1 p.m. against Delta College
  • Wednesday, Feb. 20 @ 5:30 p.m. against Schoolcraft College

T-birds tidbits

T-birds tidbits

Twana Pinskey

Managing Editor

In this, a presidential election year, I have been reflecting on how much things have changed over the last four years.

Four years ago, I paid around $1.87-$1.88 a gallon for gas.

What I wouldn’t give to see those prices again.

Over the summer months, I have watched prices at my local station rise by 30 cents. I currently pay close to $3.90 a gallon for gas. As a result, I can barely maintain my budget.

One would think with summer behind us, the kids all back in school, that prices would hold steady or decline, not keep rising.

Watching the news, one hears reports as to why costs escalate. Reasons range from how warm last winter was to refineries that are closed due to explosions, the weak economy, greedy oil companies or the United States dependency on foreign oil.

These seemingly plausible answers have become so redundant, I find myself questioning their validity.

According to Daniel Yergin, author of “The Quest: Energy, Security, and the Remaking of the Modern World”, in comments he made to the Wall Street Journal Sept.13,2012, Yergin said he believed shale gas(formed from being trapped in shale formations) production now accounts for 40 percent of U.S. gas production.

Yergin explained that technologies used to harvest shale gas, have revitalized U.S. oil production. As exciting as this news seems to be, I highly doubt our country will return to the dominance it once had in the oil industry.

Nonetheless, as our production increases, I would hope our dependence on foreign oil will decrease.

I am realistic enough to know the days of $1.88 a gallon gas are gone. I would settle for enough of a decrease that I can afford to pay my utilities and not worry about how to put food on the table.

Journey into the unseen

Journey into the unseen

Zachary Penzien

Production Editor

Have you ever heard about a videogame that has never surfaced, leaving you wondering if they were ever real or a lack luster fever dream?

If so, do I have the website for you!

Unseen64.net is an archive of material from canceled, unseen and beta videogames. In the past week, most spare time I’ve had has been lost on browsing the site packed with concept art, tech demos and information about games from every notable console and iteration of PC’s.

Unseen64 also has concept art and demo videos from games that have come out, but if you’re just interested in seeing video content Unseen64 has to offer, check out www.youtube.com/ user/monokoma.

I got lost in Unseen64 because I love to see the creative process behind the media I like.

When the Nintendo DS first came out I heard a rumor from one of my friends that “Halo 2” was coming to the DS. I was excited that I would be able to take one of my favorite games with me, but it never surfaced and I assumed that my friend gotten some bad information.

My friend was correct; Unseen64 has a video of a tech demo for the game that was apparently scrapped.

Unseen 64 is a love letter to the creative process of videogames. If you’re like me and get lost in the “making of” parts of DVDs, give it a look. I’m sure it will be added to your bookmarks in no time.

Could you give a care?

Could you give a care?

Erick Fredendall

Business/Advertising Editor

“If you take on thing from tonight: get involved with the game.”

You may recognize this quote from the front page, or maybe you missed it. If so, I would strongly recommend reading the report before continuing on with this editorial.

I spoke with Tim Skubick very briefly after the speech. He shook my hand, and upon learning that I was a student of journalism gave me some words of encouragement.

However, during that brief conversation, I noted something about Skubick that gave me pause and made me reflect on what he was doing here at the college.

Skubick knew that half the students were forced to be at the presentation. As he admitted that to me, he concluded with the statement, “I truly hope that they took away something from what I gave them tonight.”

My heart grieves to say this, but I don’t know if they did.

I spoke with multiple students after the presentation, and I found that the majority of the responses could be categorized into three statements, “I don’t care, I just don’t have the time, or it doesn’t really affect me.”

Indifference was a reoccurring theme in almost every student that I surveyed that day, and upon that statement, I base this conclusion—this isn’t about the politicians being corrupt, it’s about the population not caring enough to learn.

How can we elect representatives to represent us if the extent of our reasoning is whether or not the candidate has an R or a D in front of their name?

What’s worse, we have more information at our fingertips than any other generation prior, all right there just a mouse click away.

I would like to reiterate the message that Tim Skubick tried to relay to the students that missed the event. Take a look at crcmich.org. Go to Mlive.com. Take a look at the .gov sites, and understand that it is your responsibility as a citizen to participate.

These decisions affect our country, and if you’ve ever heard the expression “shit rolls downhill,” then you will understand that ultimately it’s our state, our communities, and our families you’re representing.

Make it count.

Political correspondent speaks to voters at SC4

Political correspondent speaks to voters at SC4

 

Erick Fredendall

Business/Advertising Editor

Decided and undecided voters alike gathered in the Fine Arts Theater at SC4 on Oct. 22 to listen to political news correspondent Tim Skubick speak on the upcoming elections.

Skubick hosts the WKAR-TV’s news segment called “Off the Record,” a political talk program focused on Michigan politics.

Roughly half the auditorium rose from their seats after being asked to stand up if they had already selected a presidential candidate for the November elections.

After skimming the crowd, the speaker walked over to a man who had not stood, proffered his hand and said, “I’m Tim Skubick. I’m from the media, and I’m here to help you.”

Tim Skubick of WKAR-TV’s “Off the Record” speaking in the Fine Arts Theater at SC4 Oct. 22. Photo Credit: Liz Whittemore

Skubick guided the audience through subject after subject, ranging from the presidential candidates, the state of political journalism, and the state proposals.

A reoccurring theme in Skubick’s presentation was the lack of substance in politician’s stances.

“Media has turned our politicians into actors,” Skubick explained, “After the presidential debate the media isn’t reviewing the debated issues, they’re covering who was the most energetic and who had the better tie.”

Audience response to Skubick’s question, “Do you believe the media is bias?” in the SC4 theater on Oct. 22. Photo Credit: Liz Whittemore

Skubick also warned the audience to not limit their news sources to the people who they agree with. He encouraged for all voters to look at arguments from both sides of the political spectrum.

The main message, however, lied in the statement that participation is crucial for this democratic system to work.

SC4 freshman Nathan Abraham, 18, agreed with Skubick’s position. “In the republic we have you have to be an educated voter, and don’t get turned off by the system not doing what it’s supposed to do for us—it will change as long as you keep trying.”

On the other side of the spectrum, SC4 sophomore Bao Mcrandall, 23, feels overwhelmed with the amount of information that needs to be processed in order to make an educated decision, “I think I will start to pay a lot more attention to politics after listening to Skubick.”

Something that Skubick may very well be relieved to hear, because his closing statement that night was, “If you take nothing else away from here, get involved in the game.”

Dark Knight returns… to DVD

Dark Knight returns… to DVD

Zachary Penzien

Production Editor

With Christopher Nolan’s Batman series wrapped up, I thought that I had my Batman movie fix for at least another year. But the recent release of DC’s “The Dark Knight Returns: Part 1” on DVD and Bluray has shown me how wrong I was.

This adaption of Frank Millers work leaves me waiting semi patiently for part two.

“The Dark Knight Returns” takes place in a Gotham City with crime rates out of control since Batman disappeared 10 years ago. In that time a gang calling themselves The Mutants has taken over the streets.

Through all of this, Batman is nowhere to be seen until the escape of a “rehabilitated” Harvey “Twoface” Dent, which prompts the pushing fifty Bruce Wayne to dawn the mantle of Batman to clean up the streets.

The Dark Knight Returns Part one Poster

Helping Batman on his war on crime is a young girl named Carrie Kelley, who aspires to take up the mantel of Robin. She is excited for Batman’s return, but not everyone in the city shares her enthusiasm.

TV personalities and public opinion are shifting away from favoring Gotham’s silent protector.

Usually the direct to DVD market is a desolate waste land of ill conceived projects and sequels that haven’t seen the original cat for several iterations. This however is not one of those movies.

With the voice work of Pieter Weller, aka Robocop, taking up the cowl for Batman, and Michal Emerson of “Lost” voicing the Joker in the upcoming part two. This is a can’t miss.

It needs to be pointed out that this movie is not for young kids, but the fact it’s a Frank Miller story should tell you all you need to know about that. The “Dark Knight Returns: Part One,” is available on DVD, Bluray, and On Demand right now.

T-birds tidbits

T-birds tidbits

Twana Pinskey

Managing Editor

In this, a presidential election year, I have been reflecting on how much things have changed over the last four years.

Four years ago, I paid around $1.87-$1.88 a gallon for gas.

What I wouldn’t give to see those prices again.

Over the summer months, I have watched prices at my local station rise by 30 cents. I currently pay close to $3.90 a gallon for gas. As a result, I can barely maintain my budget.

One would think with summer behind us, the kids all back in school, that prices would hold steady or decline, not keep rising.

Watching the news, one hears reports as to why costs escalate. Reasons range from how warm last winter was to refineries that are closed due to explosions, the weak economy, greedy oil companies or the United States dependency on foreign oil.

These seemingly plausible answers have become so redundant, I find myself questioning their validity.

According to Daniel Yergin, author of “The Quest: Energy, Security, and the Remaking of the Modern World”, in comments he made to the Wall Street Journal Sept.13,2012, Yergin said he believed shale gas(formed from being trapped in shale formations) production now accounts for 40 percent of U.S. gas production.

Yergin explained that technologies used to harvest shale gas, have revitalized U.S. oil production. As exciting as this news seems to be, I highly doubt our country will return to the dominance it once had in the oil industry.

Nonetheless, as our production increases, I would hope our dependence on foreign oil will decrease.

I am realistic enough to know the days of $1.88 a gallon gas are gone. I would settle for enough of a decrease that I can afford to pay my utilities and not worry about how to put food on the table.