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Front page article

Digging up a bit of history

Rocks, ants, grubs and dirt. Lots and lots of dirt.

In honor of National Archeology Day, SC4 hosted its first exploratory excavation on Saturday, Oct.22, from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the field between the Fine Arts Building and the Citizens First Michigan Technical Education Center on the SC4 campus.

In what used to be a residential neighborhood in the nineteenth century, the dig targeted the area in hopes of finding the foundation of a residence, as well as artifacts that would give not only insight into life during this time, but also of the progression from the residential area into today’s SC4 campus.

Upper left: William Pilkey, of Memphis, measures some findings. Upper middle: Nicholas Brier, 13 of Fort Gratiot (left) Pilkey (right) remove dirt surrounding an artifact. Upper right: SC4 Professor Robert Richardson, of Fort Gratiot, records findings. Middle left:  One of the artifacts believed to be a tile fragment. Middle: Pilkey and Brier sort through dirt. Middle right: Recovered 1960 toy motorcycle. Bottom left: Pilkey and Richardson uncover a large stone. Bottom middle: Michael Walling, 12 of Fort Gratiot, Brier, and Pilkey dig in their unit. Bottom right: Excavation volunteer removes dirt around a finding. Artifacts surrounding middle: Fragment of a ceramic doll, undated coin found during excavation, various recovered unidentified fragments, and ceramic fragment believed to be a part of cookware.  Illustration by Liz Whittemore, photos by Twana Pinskey and Liz Whittemore
Upper left: William Pilkey, of Memphis, measures some findings. Upper middle: Nicholas Brier, 13 of Fort Gratiot (left) Pilkey (right) remove dirt surrounding an artifact. Upper right: SC4 Professor Robert Richardson, of Fort Gratiot, records findings. Middle left: One of the artifacts believed to be a tile fragment. Middle: Pilkey and Brier sort through dirt. Middle right: Recovered 1960 toy motorcycle. Bottom left: Pilkey and Richardson uncover a large stone. Bottom middle: Michael Walling, 12 of Fort Gratiot, Brier, and Pilkey dig in their unit. Bottom right: Excavation volunteer removes dirt around a finding. Artifacts surrounding middle: Fragment of a ceramic doll, undated coin found during excavation, various recovered unidentified fragments, and ceramic fragment believed to be a part of cookware. Illustration by Liz Whittemore, photos by Twana Pinskey and Liz Whittemore

“Part of my goal is to not only find out data about the college’s past, but to also do some education to teach people about archeology and how science works,” said SC4 Professor Robert Richardson.

Led by SC4 faculty from a mixture of departments, the excavation intended to increase appreciation and knowledge of archeology and our local history. Both SC4 students and the public were welcome to attend and participate.

“One of the things that archeology is trying to get at is to study the lives of people who came before us, and so that makes it a very mutual thing,” said Richardson.

Multiple items were found, among them being a pipe, coal fragments, a toy matchbox motorcycle that was only produced in 1960, pieces of brick and mortar, brown bottle glass, and ceramics with transfer printing that date back to the late nineteenth century.

“The cemetery’s across Glenwood. We won’t find a body here,” said Richardson.

For information on future digs, you can contact Professor Richardson at rrichardson @sc4.edu or on his office phone at (810) 989-5613. Email is the preferred method of contact.

“This is the first annual event and I’m hoping that we generate enough enthusiasm and interest that we can continue to have archeology here on campus and throughout the Blue Water area,” said Richardson.

Liz Whittemore

Photo Editor


Your schooling may be over, but remember that your education still continues.

“My favorite memory of Lisa would be when I first met her! I walked into class with Twana and was amazed at this woman, so full of excitement over painting on someone face! She was incredible. This being the first time I met her, I was shocked at how personal she was with everyone. I took her class because of my wonderful experience with Twana that day and I am truly grateful for knowing her!”

-Jasmine Hall

“My favorite memory of Mrs. Sturtridge was how when we were in her class and she would always tell us one of her childhood stories. Especially when she pointed out that she grew up with one of my friends, and classmates, Craig Desjardin’s family and growing up on the street where I now live and how she told me all about the people that used to live there.”

-Brittany Vermeersch

Lisa Sturtridge, Adjunct Theatre Discipline Instructor, working with students in her fundamentals of stage makeup class, fall 2011.  Photo Credit: Twana Pinskey
Lisa Sturtridge, Adjunct Theatre Discipline Instructor, working with students in her fundamentals of stage makeup class, fall 2011. Photo Credit: Twana Pinskey

“My favorite memory of Lisa was the stories she told me of my family. You see, my dad’s brother and sisters grew up with Lisa on the same block. She would tell me stories of what my father used to do and how they used to play baseball in this field behind there street. She also told me about how my grandmother taught her how to sew dresses. Her stories brought back memories of my grandmother, and, for that hour, she felt like another Aunt, or even my grandmother, for she would always call me Paul, the name of one of my uncles, just like my grandmother.”

-Craig DesJardins

“We had been worrying about a particular student and something the student was struggling with. And we had this long conversation about what kind of options there were, and what might happen, and how to best do what would be useful for the student. We had come up with this very interesting, sort of formal ‘this is what you can do and what you can’t do and here’s the plan and here’s how you help and these are the suggestions you can make.’ About 20 minutes later I walk out into the hallway and Lisa has literally taken the student by the hand, she’s holding the student by the wrist, and she’s saying ‘Yes I know, but you’re coming with me, no, you’re coming with me, you’re coming with me right now, right now, and we’re going over there and I’m not letting go until you do.’ And I looked at her and I said, ‘Lisa this is the plan?’ And she said, ‘Well, whatever it takes, right?’ If she had a student that was struggling, she was just determined that she was going to do whatever she had to do to help.”

-Elaine Schatzline-Behr

“We were working on one of those blood and gore makeup things for an arts festival in town. Lisa showed up and there was a teenage boy who had just finished doing a big, gooey, wound, burn thing on his arm, and she walked over and she looked over at it and she said ‘Ohhh…that’s gross! That’s disgusting! I love it!’ Really well done make-up, she just loved it no matter how gross it was.”

-Elaine Schatzline-Behr

“Watching her interaction with the students, her enthusiasm. She had great recipes; her recipe for Febreeze is cheap vodka and water in a spray bottle.”

-Karen Jezewoski

“My sister, who was in the band, symphonic band with Lisa in high school. And Sue and Lisa were always fighting for first chair, and my sister was a pretty decent French horn player…she said Lisa was the most beautiful French horn player.”

-Holly Pennington

Liz Whittemore

Photo Editor

Students and colleagues mourn loss of beloved instructor

Students and colleagues, along with the cast and crew of the SC4 production of “Fool for Love,” grieve the loss of Adjunct Theatre Discipline Instructor, Lisa Sturtridge.

Lisa Sturtridge, Adjunct Theatre Discipline Instructor. Photo Credit: Twana Pinskey
Lisa Sturtridge, Adjunct Theatre Discipline Instructor. Photo Credit: Twana Pinskey

Sturtridge was doing what she loved best, helping her students perfect the craft of stage makeup and preparing for a show when she died on Oct. 10, 2011.

Sturtridge lived in Port Huron and was an adjunct faculty member of the Visual and Performing Arts Department at SC4, where she taught Fundamentals of Stage Makeup and Fundamentals of Theatre at SC4.

She had been the costume designer working on numerous Theatre Discipline productions at SC4 since 2004. She had worked in professional and academic theatre for more than 30 years.

She earned a bachelor’s degree in technical theatre with a costume and lighting design emphasis from Michigan State University, and a master’s degree in costume design and dramatic literature from Emerson College in Boston. She also had designed costumes for Port Huron Civic Theatre.

As news of Sturtridge’s passing spread, students, faculty and colleagues paused to remember Sturtridge.

Shawn Starkey, Executive Director of SC4 Publics Relations, said grief counselors were made available to students, colleagues and faculty.

“We are in shock, she was a well respected and cared about instructor,” said Starkey. “Our prayers and sympathies go out to her family, friends and students during this difficult time.”

Adjunct Instructor for the Visual and Performing Arts, and Drama Club Adviser, Tom Kephart, shared an office with Sturtridge and was working with her on the SC4 production of “Fool for Love” at the time of her death.

Kephart first met Sturtridge when he did the SC4 show, “Christmas Belles” three years ago. He said they spent a lot of time together since they shared an office.

“It’s just really weird to know she is not going to walk through the door anymore,” said Kephart. “The thing I admired most about Lisa is how she cared, really cared about the students at SC4.”

Kephart said former students have been calling and stopping in since her death, asking what they can do to help. Kephart felt this was a testimony to how students past and present felt about Sturtridge.

“Fool for Love” cast member Christian Jones, from St. Clair, SC4 sophomore and liberal arts major, shared his fondest memory of Sturtridge from the SC4 Drama Club production of “Welcome to the Moon.”

Jones’ character was a poet.

Sturtridge looked at him and wondered what to do for a costume. As a joke, Jones asked her for a Mozart wig and vest from that time period. According to Jones, she said she could do that and left coming back with a Mozart wig and period vest.

“She (Sturtridge) said I didn’t think anyone would ever ask for this in a million years,” shared Jones while laughing. “And of course she had it.”

Sound crew member from “Fool for Love,” SC4 student Alyssa Ferri, a veterinary major from Cass City, shared how Sturtridge loved her job and was always there for her students.

“She impacted everyone she knew,” said Ferri. “She had a way of touching everyone’s heart and she never forgot about her students.”

Kephart expressed similar sentiments. “It was her (Sturtridge) only constant, coming in here and working with the students is what made it worthwhile for her.”

There will be a memorial service honoring Lisa Oct.28th, at 3p.m. in the Fine Arts Auditorium.

Twana Pinskey

Editor-in-Chief

Student Government dodgeball a success

Rule number one: no balls to the face.

On Tuesday, Sept. 27, Student Government hosted a free dodgeball tournament for student clubs in the SC4 gym from 10-12:30 p.m.

All players representing the clubs had to be SC4 students and active in those clubs.

The clubs that participated included: the Music Club, the Criminal Justice Club, the Gay Straight Alliance Club, the Student Government, and the Zombie Defense Council.

The winner of the tournament was given a small trophy. The semester’s dodgeball tournament winner was the Gay Straight Alliance Club.

Sean Lathrop, President of the Gay Straight Alliance Club said, “We played smarter, not harder.”

Each game lasted three minutes. In that length of time, the goal is to eliminate all players of the opposing team. If that does not happen, then at the end of three minutes the team with the least amount of eliminated players wins the game.

Upper left: Criminal Justice Club member Justin King and Gay Straight Alliance Club member Ryan Silver struggling to gain control of the dodgeball.  Upper middle: Members of the Criminal Justice Club and the Zombie Defense Council race toward the middle to get the dodgeballs.  Upper right: Criminal Justice Club members Justin King and Anthony Paolella take aim against the opposing team. Middle: Gay Straight Alliance Club members, and winners of the dodgeball tournament, Ryan Silver, Sean Lathrop and August Smith show off their newly acquired trophy.  Bottom left: Criminal Justice Club members ready themselves for the next game to start.  Bottom middle: Student Government Vice President Jonathon Brewer acts as referee for the game.  Bottom right: Zombie Defense Council members Caitlin Combs and Chris Campbell devise a plan of attack.
Upper left: Criminal Justice Club member Justin King and Gay Straight Alliance Club member Ryan Silver struggling to gain control of the dodgeball. Upper middle: Members of the Criminal Justice Club and the Zombie Defense Council race toward the middle to get the dodgeballs. Upper right: Criminal Justice Club members Justin King and Anthony Paolella take aim against the opposing team. Middle: Gay Straight Alliance Club members, and winners of the dodgeball tournament, Ryan Silver, Sean Lathrop and August Smith show off their newly acquired trophy. Bottom left: Criminal Justice Club members ready themselves for the next game to start. Bottom middle: Student Government Vice President Jonathon Brewer acts as referee for the game. Bottom right: Zombie Defense Council members Caitlin Combs and Chris Campbell devise a plan of attack.

The Gay Straight Alliance Club came in first, the Music Club second, then the Criminal Justice Club, Student Government, and then the Zombie Defense Council.

Production Editor for the Erie Square Gazette and Zombie Defense Council President Zachary Penzien said, “I feel that the ZDC did good in this event, as Poison once said we, ‘don’t need nothin’ but a good time.’ Also I think what we lacked in athleticism we made up for in enthusiasm.”

“If you can dodge a wrench, you can dodge a ball!” Sean Lathrop said, quoting the character Patches O’ Houlihan from the 2004 movie “Dodgeball: A True Underdog Story.”

The event gave the clubs a chance to promote themselves, be involved with school, and have fun with friends.

“I think that we will probably actually practice in the future, that may help,” said Penzien.

“Every club played their heart out. It was impressive to see how well teams play and work together,” said Student Government Treasurer Matthew Boyd.

Student Government Vice President Jonathon Brewer said, “Overall I think the tournament fulfilled the intentions of Student Government. We organized and executed an event that was for the clubs. The awareness of those clubs were made through social media and personal interactions.”

There is hope to make the dodgeball tournament a once a semester event. At this moment in time, the event for next semester has not yet been approved by Student Government and no planning has been started.

“The intentions are for it to happen though,” said Jonathon Brewer.

For more information on student clubs and how to get involved, click on the “Current Students” option on the SC4 website (www.sc4.edu). For information on upcoming events, check your email for the weekly Student Connections news.

Liz Whittemore

Photo Editor

We remember

Where were you?

Ask that question in reference to 9-11 and just about anyone can tell you where and what they were doing, Sept. 11, 2001.

Sept. 11, 2011, United Way of St. Clair Co. hosted a “9-11 remembrance walk” to remember the events of Sept. 11, 2001, and encourage volunteerism.

According to the United Way of St. Clair Co’s web site, the United Way Volunteer Action Center had over 1300 hours of volunteer service pledged during this remembrance walk event. The web site also stated the self guided remembrance walk included peace poles at seven different locations in Port Huron.

Poles were located in front of the main building on the SC4 campus, First United Methodist Church, St. John United Church of Christ, First Congregational Church, St. Joseph’s Catholic Church, Grace Episcopal Church, and Pine Grove Park.

A dedication was held at the United Way offices on Military Street, the sight of the eight, and newest, peace pole.

Clockwise from upper left; SC4 English Professor and “Campus Progressive” Advisor, Jackie Jablonski of Port Huron reflects on photos taken by SC4 students that visited Ground Zero in March 2011. Upper right; SC4 student Jasmine Hall of Port Huron fills out a volunteer pledge sheet during the remembrance walk. Lower right; walk participants, (left) Bibi Abdul  and Mikayla Dixon of Port Huron, listen about events that occurred when they were too young to remember. Center bottom; students from Global Awareness Club brought back memorabilia from Ground Zero they used during the 9-11 event. Lower left; walk participant Judy Albert, of Port Huron, reflects on the events of the tenth anniversary of 9-11. Center; SC4’s peace pole is one of those featured along the walk.
Clockwise from upper left; SC4 English Professor and “Campus Progressive” Advisor, Jackie Jablonski of Port Huron reflects on photos taken by SC4 students that visited Ground Zero in March 2011. Upper right; SC4 student Jasmine Hall of Port Huron fills out a volunteer pledge sheet during the remembrance walk. Lower right; walk participants, (left) Bibi Abdul and Mikayla Dixon of Port Huron, listen about events that occurred when they were too young to remember. Center bottom; students from Global Awareness Club brought back memorabilia from Ground Zero they used during the 9-11 event. Lower left; walk participant Judy Albert, of Port Huron, reflects on the events of the tenth anniversary of 9-11. Center; SC4’s peace pole is one of those featured along the walk.

Members of the SC4 Global Awareness Club presented a lecture on Ground Zero in New York, having visited there March, 2011.

SC4 student, out going Global Awareness Club President and current Student Government Treasurer, Matthew Boyd of Port Huron Township was one of those participating in the event.

“It was a good event. A lot of people are still affected by 9-11, even ten years later,” said Boyd.

Boyd explained that as a member of the Global Awareness Club, he was one of the students that went to New York in March to see Ground Zero firsthand and meet 9-11 survivors.

“It was a humbling experience, getting to see the devastation on the spot of where over 2,900 people’s lives were taken away,” said Boyd.

SC4 Liberal Arts Major, Stephanie Doan of Port Huron also participated in the walk, saying it was important to attend for all of those born after the 9-11 attack.

“If we forget, they will never really know what happened because it had no direct affect on them,” said Doan.

The United Way Volunteer Action Center promotes local volunteerism through a software program that matches volunteers with local non-profit opportunities says the organizations web site.

To learn more on how to volunteer, go to the United Way web site at: www.uwstclair.org, or call their office at: (810) 985-8169.

Twana Pinskey

Editor-in-Chief

Welcoming the Backstreet

Students returning to St Clair County Community College for the fall semester might have noticed something missing from College Center. The Bistro is no more, and in its place is the Backstreet Cafe.

Information regarding the new café is readily available to all students on the college’s web site, including hours and a menu. The information can be found under “Food Services,” or by typing “Backstreet” into the search area.

From 8 a.m. to 3 p.m., students may sate their hunger by picking up a meal from the food line. At 3 p.m. the Backstreet Cafe transitions to a grab and go that remains open until 7 p.m.

Pizza, nachos, sandwiches and soups are but a few of the foods that’ll be available to the students and faculty. Prices range from $1 to $6.

Debbie Belcher of St. Clair Shores, age 49, is one of the owners of the Backstreet Deli, which runs the Backstreet Café. According to Belcher, college functions, including events run by the various clubs found here at SC4, will have access to catering from the café.

The catering menu can also be found on the college’s web site, along with prices.

Belcher said that she and her husband, Joe Belcher, have been running the Backstreet Deli for a little over a year now.

It was in June, 2010, that the Backstreet Deli first opened its doors. A place where Joe and Debbie Belcher could blend “their experience to create a one of a kind old fashioned deli that is full of Michigan products,” as stated on the Backstreet Deli’s web site.

“Our specialty is in the area of customer satisfaction and great quality,” taken from the Backstreet Deli’s web site.

For more information regarding the Backstreet Deli, and the story of its owners Joe and Debbie Belcher, students may visit http://superiorbackstreetdeli.com.

Danielle Kennedy

Copy Editor

Nebraska Book Company files chapter eleven

Nebraska Book Company, parent company of St. Clair County Community College’s campus bookstore, has filed bankruptcy.

According to the Book Company’s web site, they own 280 bookstores nationwide, with SC4’s Campus bookstore being one of the 19 owned in Michigan.

Press releases from the book company explain this move will allow for restructuring of $450-million in debt of its holding company, the Nebraska Acquisition Corporation. Like many booksellers, Nebraska Book says it has lost business to online retailers.

St. Clair County Community College’s campus bookstore is one of 19 Michigan college bookstores owned by the Nebraska Book Company.   Photo Credit: Rachel Olivia Kobylas
St. Clair County Community College’s campus bookstore is one of 19 Michigan college bookstores owned by the Nebraska Book Company. Photo Credit: Rachel Olivia Kobylas

NBD Education.com’s web site (http://nbdeducation.com) states some of the  pros and cons of purchasing text books on line are it saves time, and is more cost effective for students, yet you don’t know the condition of the books until you receive them and students can face delays in receiving online book orders.

St. Clair County Community College’s Executive Director of Public Relations, Shawn Starkey, explained he feels the chapter eleven ruling and restructuring process won’t affect the students and staff of SC4.

“We are very comfortable with it being business as usual,” said Starkey. “It won’t affect our students or the college.”

SC4’s campus bookstore Manager, Amanda Beliveau, agreed with Starkey, also stating that it is business as usual.

“Our students are having no problems purchasing books,” said Beliveau.

Twana Pinskey

Editor-in-Chief

SC4 students see the world: mission India

Having the life of a community college student has been great and very convenient, but does not exactly provide a means to experience life outside of the comforts of home.

Since the option of transferring to a university was still a year away, I decided to sign up for a program through the Salvation Army called Summer Missions Teams, or SMT. It is a missions program that sends young adults, ages 18 to 28, to different parts of the world on mission trips lasting six weeks total.

The goal of SMT is to educate and influence the people in different countries around the world about God and the beliefs of the Salvation Army. While I was not able to choose the country that I would be sent to, or the people I would go with, my desire to do something amazing in another part of the world outweighed my concerns and fears.

I applied in early January, 2011, and on Feb. 27, was informed that my application was accepted and that I would be spending this summer in India.

I, along with six other students my age from around the central part of the United States, set out on June 13 for Chennai, India, the major city in the southern part of India. From there we took a 15 hour train ride north to the Andhra Pradesh region of East Central India.

Our trip started at the beginning of their rainy season, which usually averages around 35 to 44 degrees Celsius, or 95 to 112 degrees Fahrenheit.

Starting from the northern most part of the region, we spent the next six weeks visiting Salvation Army Churches and facilities within six different divisions of the region, including: Rahjamundry, Tanuku, Eluru, Gudivada, Mandaveli, and Vijawada. In total we visited almost 40 churches, three youth hostels, four schools, and thousands of wonderful people.

This program, we soon discovered, was just as much for our team as it was for the people, who blessed us in so many ways. We learned a new level of humbleness as we visited the homes of people and children who were incredibly poor and yet still full of joy.

SC4 student, Joel Smith, shown here in the Mandaveli Division of India with a 104 year old woman who lives on her own and receives no help from her family. She has to walk on her own to get to church. Photo Credit: Justin Johnson
SC4 student, Joel Smith, shown here in the Mandaveli Division of India with a 104 year old woman who lives on her own and receives no help from her family. She has to walk on her own to get to church. Photo Credit: Justin Johnson

Some of the villages that we visited had never had any outside contact. Many of the elderly were amazed to see a group of seven young white people. Most having never seen a white person in their life.

Although it was hard to communicate because of the language barrier, the people we met connected to us easily and we were able to build relationships with many of the people and translators who taught us a lot of Telegu, the language of the Andhra Pradesh Region.

Regardless of the evident poverty that was everywhere we traveled to, the positive effects that the Salvation Army had on this country were just as visible and amazing to see. We discovered that not only does the Salvation Army bring financial support and food to the poorest of villages, but because the people who convert to the beliefs of the Salvation Army are considered Christian, they are no longer affected by the caste system, which is still a problem throughout India.

Learning all that I have about India and meeting all the people who have influenced and done so much for me has given me a new appreciation for life. Although there is still much work to be done in India, I have experienced firsthand all of the good that is happening there right now. While my stay in India was relatively ephemeral, the events of this trip will stay with me forever.

Joel Smith

Guest Writer

Taking a bite of the Big Apple

Professor Kraig Archer,

Global Awareness Club adviser:

In New York City, I was most impressed by our students – Matt Boyd, Rachel Kobylas, Twana Pinskey, Ray Robison, and Liz Whittemore. Once it was decided the Global Awareness Club was going to New York, the students took the lead in arranging a multitude of details, such as where we would stay, transportation and the sites we would see. Their motto was, “we do the difficult immediately; the impossible takes a while longer.”

The John Lennon memorial, located in the Strawberry Fields portion of Central park, stands in memory of perhaps one of the greatest songwriters from the last century.
Photo credit Raymond Robinson The John Lennon memorial, located in the Strawberry Fields portion of Central park, stands in memory of perhaps one of the greatest songwriters from the last century.


Once in New York, they were all great representatives for our college. It was impressive how they asked Dr. Easterly – one of the world’s top authorities on international development and foreign aid – relevant questions.

Twana discussed her experiences in Honduras and plans to assist the women she has been working with there. Rachel told him of the college’s plans to send students to our sister college in Guatemala, and how we would like to work with their students to help the poor in their country.

Dr. Easterly was very impressed that students drove all the way from Michigan to see him, and that they shared their own plans for international development projects. He was humbled by that, and told them that he hoped that he would live up to their expectations as he answered their questions.

Our students also networked and established contacts with Columbia University’s chapter of Engineers Without Borders, the Peace Corps, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the State Department, the New York Police Department, the New York Fire Department and the journalism departments at both New York University and Columbia University.

Subway musicians are commonplace in New York. This gentleman earns money by playing his jing-hu, a Peking opera fiddle.
Photo Credit Twana Pinskey Subway musicians are commonplace in New York. This gentleman earns money by playing his jing-hu, a Peking opera fiddle.

On top of this they saw the United Nations, the Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island, the musical “Chicago” on Broadway, the John Lennon Memorial in Central Park, and the 9/11 Memorial at Ground Zero. They attended conferences on international careers through the government, as well as on the work of female documentary film makers. We ate great Italian, Thai, Turkish, and Cuban food. Although we didn’t get much sleep, we would all go back in a New York minute.

Matthew Boyd,

Global Awareness Club President:

The trip to New York was a great learning tool and we accomplished many goals.

Talking with Dr. Easterly and the Columbia chapter of Engineers Without Borders provided us with many ideas and options.

We were also thankful for the unexpected opportunities that presented themselves.

At a conference at NYU, we talked to the journalism department director. The director said he was “envious” of SC4, because NYU does not have an FCC license and cannot broadcast their radio station.

On the way to another workshop, we had we stopped and talked with an NYPD officer. He explained some of the NYPD’s hiring practices, and that they are currently hiring.

We learned a great deal, and we’re eager to share it all very soon.

Twana Pinskey,

Erie Square Gazette Editor-in-Chief

and Global Awareness Club member:

Visiting ground zero while in New York, I remember thinking of the beautiful, sunny day in New York, how solemn and revered ground zero felt.

Global Awareness students in NYC made contacts that will help set ground work for future humanitarian efforts in places like Chiquimula, Honduras, Africa or wherever the students and faculty of St. Clair County Community College feel compelled to answer the call to assist our global neighbors.

My proudest moment was when Adrian Mihai, Broadcast Operations Manager at New York University’s journalism department, commented SC4 has something we don’t.

You have an FCC regulated radio station?” asked Mihai.

He then went on to say how envious he was, because the students at NYU do not have a FCC regulated radio station. This felt like a confirmation that community college students can and do get what we need to compete in our chosen fields.

Ray Robinson,

Erie Square Gazette Managing Editor

and Global Awareness Club member:

The “City that Never Sleeps,” the “Big Apple,” the “City so Nice They Named it Twice” and “Gotham.” Each name invokes many visuals, but they all refer to New York City.

With its many burroughs, you can be there a month and still not enjoy every experience.

To stand in the heart of Times Square is almost overwhelming; the sights and sounds may be irritating, but in some ways flow like music.

New York City has many nationalities under its umbrella. Having experienced this world for the first time, I was impressed how it flowed as a single entity.

Liz Whittemore,

Erie Square Gazette Photo Editor

and Global Awareness Club member:

I’d never visited NYC before it became Ground Zero. Even knowing what had occurred, standing outside the construction of “Freedom Tower” felt ordinary, like any other construction site. It was disheartening to be where so much devastation occurred and feel nothing.

The WTC Tribute Center is truly remarkable. As the daughter of a history buff, that says a lot considering I cringe at the thought of a museum, due to a childhood of being dragged to them.

The museum has pieces of the wreckage, pictures, missing persons signs and even quotes of those that had been affected.

The Center gives visitors a realistic representation of what had happened. Nothing is sugar coated.

September 11 was nothing less than devastation, and walking away from the museum leaves you feeling heartbroken but inspired.

We may have lost 3000 lives, and our tallest buildings may have collapsed, but as a nation we are strong and unwavering.

As economy goes down, student prices go up.

At a meeting held Thursday, March 17, the SC4 Board of Trustees voted unanimously to increase tuition.

In-district students will pay $91 per credit hour versus the previous $89. Out of district students will pay $177 per contact hour, up from $170. Out-of-state students pay $258 a contact hour versus $247.

graph by Cody Kimball


The decline of local and state revenue given to the school and a decrease in enrollment have been blamed for the tuition increase.

According to President Kevin Pollock, tuition is one of three ways SC4 generates revenue along with state and local taxes, which are both declining. “The three combined, along with cuts that have been made over the past year, will balance the college’s budget and allow us to maintain the programs and services we offer the students,” said Pollock

Jesse Todd, a current student, said, “It would suck. I already struggle financially at times with the Nelnet payment plan.”

The financial increase at first glance, looks like no big deal, but the impact of it could really hurt some students next year,” said chemistry major Donna Akin-Sherwood.

SC4 offers a booklet with a list of scholarships offered by various businesses and donors during the fall and winter semesters. The deadline for these scholarship opportunities is usually at the beginning of March.

Jessica Jack

Eric Merrill

Staff Writers