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Front page article

On the shoulders of giants Life after the Erie Square Gazette

Twana Pinskey

Editor-in-Chief

Since the earliest years of the Port Huron Area Junior College, there has been a college newspaper on the campus of St. Clair County Community College.

In 2011, SC4’s student newspaper, the Erie Square Gazette, celebrated 80 consecutive years of publishing a college newspaper, once known as the Huron Log.

SC4 alumnus, WWII veteran, teacher, public school superintendent and active pilot, Dr. Robert Coulter, a 1938 graduate of the junior college, is also the former Editor-in-Chief of the then Huron Log, student newspaper of the junior college.

Coulter said his experience as the editor of the Huron Log provided him the experience of writing, as well as life skills, in the area of time management.

“I kept busy. I participated in many clubs while at the college,” said Coulter.

According to Coulter, the dean was always after him because the dean felt Coulter was involved in too many campus club activities. Coulter explained he kept busy by participation and enjoyed all the varied activities campus life had to offer.

However, life was not without its challenges for Coulter.

Coulter said his family moved to the Port Huron area during the depression. His father, worked as an artist and a sign painter. His mother, a stay at home mom, died giving birth. Coulter was 7-years-old.

Despite all these challenges, Coulter said he wanted to go to school. Coulter explained he knew he always liked books and school.

“Even in my childhood, I loved education,” said Coulter.

As he grew into young adulthood, Coulter held different jobs in Port Huron. He worked at Kresge’s, drove a truck and once worked at a dress shop, where his job was to dress the mannequins. Coulter met his wife, Barbara Ann while working at a dollar store.

However after completing his education at junior college, Coulter traveled the world as an active duty member of the U.S. Air Force in World War II.

Coulter completed his junior college education, before meeting and talking to the local draft board president. Coulter said the draft board president, told him (Coulter) that on Monday, he would be joining the army.

“I looked at him and said ‘Like hell I will’,” said Coulter. That same day, he went and joined the Air Corp.

Coulter served in Italy with the Fifteenth Air Force. According to Coulter, some of their missions were flown with the Tuskegee Airmen flying cover for his unit. He shared that while the Tuskegee Airmen flew cover for his group, they never lost a plane. He also recalled how French classes he took at the junior college paid off while serving overseas.

His college French teacher, Miss Lay always told him, “Bob you have to learn this French, you might need it one day.” Coulter said he was able to use his second language to order dinner for himself and his friends while serving in Africa.

He spent four years in the service, with his educational plans changing as a result.

After completing service to his country, Coulter went on to Wayne State University, earning his bachelor of science in education and master’s in counseling and education and doctorate of education. He spent his working career with the Port Huron area schools, eventually rising to position of superintendent in 1947.

Additionally, since retiring, Coulter has written a book, “World at War, WW2: Four Years, Four Months, Twenty Three Days” about his military service.

Today, Coulter contributes time back to SC4, the college where he got his start.

He serves as a volunteer at SC4 events, such as graduation ceremonies. He is a member, and past president, of the SC4 Alumni Association. Coulter also sings in his church choir; as well as serves as the President of the Port Huron Branch of the International Symphony Association.

SC4 alumnus, Dr. Robert Coulter of Port Huron, volunteers at SC4 events, such as last year’s graduation, May of 2011. Photo by Twana Pinskey
SC4 alumnus, Dr. Robert Coulter of Port Huron, volunteers at SC4 events, such as last year’s graduation, May of 2011. Photo by Twana Pinskey

Coulter and his late wife, Barbara Ann, have two children, five grandchildren and six great-grandchildren.

Additionally, Coulter noted that besides him, his grandson, as well as both his children, all were students at St. Clair County Community College.

Regarding the state of journalism, Coulter explained he felt local newspaper reporting did not have the quality as once before. He discussed newspapers of today facing a tough battle to compete and survive.

“Our local paper now prints in Lansing and has equipment sitting in a basement,” said Coulter.

Moreover, Coulter felt that newspapers that publish hardcopy can and will survive Internet newspapers. He felt there would be a turnaround from internet back to hardcopy.

Coulter said that there would be a reaction to internet news, resulting in a shift back to hardcopy.

“I like a book, a newspaper in my hands,” he said.

If you would like a copy of Coulter’s book, “World at War, WW2: Four Years, Four Months, Twenty Three Days” in your hands, contact him at (810)985-5738.

 

SC4 got its dance on

Danielle Kennedy

Copy Editor

   How does SC4 celebrate Black History Month?

With a packed gymnasium and a group known as the Zuzu African Acrobats, hailing from Mombasa Kenya.

“It was the largest single audience I have ever experienced on our campus during my 16 years at SC4,” said Pete Lacey, Vice President of Student Services and Chair of the Global Diversity Council. “The gym was full of energy and audience members were having a great time.”

On Feb. 11, the Zuzu African Acrobats troupe performed in the SC4 gymnasium. Several of the members of the group were known for having appeared on “America’s Got Talent.”

“I thought the show was fantastic,” said Geri Kimbro, founder of MLK event and SC4 Global Diversity member, “They were awesome.”

They danced, they tumbled, they contorted their bodies in cringe worthy manners, and they balanced precariously on chairs. All for the pleasure of the audience.

Zuzu members entertain audience by balancing on objects such as chairs during their performance.
Zuzu members entertain audience by balancing on objects such as chairs during their performance.

An audience that was at times, part of the show.

“We packed the gym for the first time in years, and it couldn’t have been any better. And I was glad to see so many young people participating in the show,” said Kimbro.

One of those participants was a former SC4 student who wished to be known by his stage name, Phoenix. He was amongst many audience members who chose to show off their limbo skills.

“It was hard. I did it before, but that always was hard for me before,” said Phoenix. He went on to say that he enjoyed the show, and would attend if SC4 did a similar event in the future.

A former SC4 student, who wanted to be known by his stage name Phoenix, performed the limbo during audience participation.
A former SC4 student, who wanted to be known by his stage name Phoenix, performed the limbo during audience participation.

“Based upon the success of this show we will certainly be looking to offer a similar type of experience to our campus and community next year,” said Lacey.

“We hope to come and perform again,” said Zuzu African Acrobat, Edison Baya.

Baya said that what he and the others do when performing is considered a part of their culture. And that if anyone is to take anything away from the show, “we like for them to do some exercising.”

Kimbro felt that the acrobats brought some cultural diversity to SC4, and “that’s what we’re all about.”

“We wanted to provide the audience an opportunity to have fun while experiencing the rich cultural history of East Africa in celebration of Black History Month,” said Lacey.

Lacey said that feedback from the show has been very positive.

“Audience members left our campus happy and several people posted on Facebook about how much they enjoyed the show. We were also contacted by an organization in Canada that saw the article in the Times Herald and wanted contact information,” said Lacey.

How did SC4 manage to snag such an event?

“We actually received an email prior to the holiday’s from the organizer stating they would be traveling near our area and wondering if we would be interested in a show,” said Lacey. “We were looking for an event to celebrate Black History Month and inquired about bringing the show to our campus.”

A Crayola masterpiece

Alyssha Ginzel

Managing Editor

The halls of the Fine Arts Building buzzed with smiling young artists displaying their masterpieces in water color, paper-mache, and crayon.

Yes, you heard right. Crayon.

Art teachers from over 25 elementary schools in the St. Clair Country area proudly recognized student art on the opening day reception to the forty-fourth annual Beatrice Thornton Art Exhibit Thursday, Feb. 2.

Approximately 915 two-dimensional pieces and over 200 three-dimensional pieces currently decorate the walls of the Fine Arts Building, giving the school a colorful, joyful renovation.

Students aged kindergarten through fifth grade anxiously whirled through the crowd of fellow artists Thursday evening in attempt to hunt out their prize piece.

“Look, mom, look!” was often heard as a child beamed with excitement to proud parents.

Elementary students view peer artwork. Photo by Alyssha Ginzel
Elementary students view peer artwork. Photo by Alyssha Ginzel

Parents of six year old triplets Ethan, Ella, and Collin Martin from Garden Elementary were pleased to have each of their children display a piece in the exhibit.

The exhibit also welcomed several art teachers to the event who supported and congratulated their students.

Kumar Sarcar, an art teacher at Thomas Edison Elementary, Michigamme Elementary, and Trinity Elementary said he loves teaching children because, “They have good, positive attitudes and open minds.”

His second grade student, Camryn Sparschu from Thomas Edison Elementary was belated to see Mr. Sarcar and welcomed him with a hug just before answering what must have been a question that stumped the class earlier in the day.  “I know the answer!  I know it!  Van Gough was Dutch,” she said affirmatively.  “Am I right?  Am I the first to get the answer!?”

Such positive, healthy support from the family and the community can only be beneficial and encouraging to extending the children’s learning experience outside of the classroom.

Thanks to SC4, the curiosity of the elementary students could also be nurtured in extending their visit to exploration of art classrooms at SC4.

Many thanks to Karen Jezewski and to all others who helped organize and host the event for providing such a warm, constructive, positive atmosphere for the students and their parents.

SC4 will host the opening day reception to the portion of the Beatrice Thornton Student Art Exhibit, which will include middle school and high school art from 4 to 6 p.m. Thursday, March 1.

Any further questions can be answered by Karen Jezewski at (810) 989-5709.

Coast 2 coast: SC4 philosopher aims to build department

Michael Scott

Staff Writer

This past July, St. Clair County Community College found itself facing the daunting task of finding a replacement for long time professor, Thomas Obee, and his 43 years of experience.

The man SC4 chose to fill that void is Oregon native James Soto.

“When I first moved here, I felt like I had the biggest shoes in the city to fill,” said the 43 year-old Carnegie Mellon University graduate.

Very quickly, Soto had the notion that he was replacing a man who was very well respected within the city of Port Huron. Excited to build upon the legacy left by Obee, he intends to further develop the SC4 Philosophy department along the lines of his own interests and research.

“I’m just another community college student trying to give back to other community college students,” said Soto.

If students are interested in Soto and philosophy, they can take his new course: PHL 213 Ethics. The class is three credits and requires no prerequisite.

New instructor, James Soto, during a lecture on Feb. 7, 2012.  Photo Credit: Liz Whittemore
New instructor, James Soto, during a lecture on Feb. 7, 2012. Photo Credit: Liz Whittemore

The enthusiastic Soto said that he is most interested in researching the ways in which people learn. He uses his previous knowledge of child language acquisition and translates that into how students respond and learn through negative evidence.

“I’m still trying to figure out how to teach. I find it the most fascinating puzzle, when it comes to philosophy and intellectual inquiry. What’s great about it is in a sense I’m just a big student in front of the class. Because as I watch my students develop, as I go through the process of teaching I am constantly learning how to do my craft better, and that’s my favorite thing,” declared Soto.

But James Soto is more than just a college instructor.

The student amongst students is an avid baseball nut!

Spending his summers pitching for a men’s team in Detroit, he enjoys following his two favorite teams: The Seattle Mariners and Pittsburgh Pirates.

He is an avid reader and investigator. Also, he enjoys taking his three dogs for walks along Lighthouse Beach daily, especially his pride and joy, a three year old pit bull, Sipo.

He is married to a wonderful Russian woman named Oanasuditu (pronounced Wan-na).

Soto’s educational roots extend from Reed College in Portland, Oregon, across the country to Pittsburgh where he finished graduate school and worked part time teaching for a few years.

With Michigan being the third coast he has hit, he added that he is excited, and is surrounded by a wonderful group of colleagues and dedicated students.

With admiration for the city in his heart, Soto says, “It is really spectacular. I like the architecture downtown. When I first came and saw the bridges it reminded me of a miniature Chicago.”

Hoping to achieve tenure while contributing to the community, Soto offered that he plans to remain in Port Huron and eventually retire in the city like Obee, working well into his 60’s, “I plan on working till my body breaks!”

Breaking News: Women’s basketball coach resigns

Clay Kimball

Webmaster

This past Wednesday, Skippers’ women’s basketball coach, Lakita Gantz, stepped down from her position prior to the game against Schoolcraft College.

Lakita Gantz
Lakita Gantz

Athletic director Dale Vos was reached for comment about said resignation.

Vos could not comment on reasons behind the resignation of the former coach, but reassured that the season would continue.

Mike Groulx, men’s assistant basketball coach, will fill in as interim coach, with help from current women’s assistant coach, Lucretia Bowerman.

Groulx will maintain this position until the end of the season, at which point the hiring process for a new coach will begin, sometime around March.

Vos maintains that the lady Skippers will be able to withstand this blow and finish the season strong.

More information will be provided as the story develops.

Remembering the Legacy: ten years of celebrating King at SC4

Twana Pinskey

Editor-in-Chief

The message of equality rings as loudly today as it did 44 years ago.

St. Clair County Community College hosted their Tenth Annual Martin Luther King Jr. Day Celebration Monday, Jan 16, 2012 at the fine arts building.

According to SC4 Public Relations Director, Shawn Starkey, over 200 people attended the event.

King, a civil rights leader, was killed in Memphis, Tennessee, on April 4, 1968.

According to event founder, Geri Kimbro, this event was started to assure King’s message would not be forgotten.

Kimbro is also a member of the SC4 Global Diversity Advisory Council and a SC4 alumnus. Kimbro gave the introduction at the event.

Kimbro explained the message of equality still needs to be taught.

“It begins at home. It is up to the parents to teach our children,” said Kimbro.

Kimbro said she had the opportunity to meet King and his wife in 1967-1968.

“I actually sang in a church choir with Coretta King,” said Kimbro.

Pete Lacey, SC4 Vice President of Student Services, Adjunct Instructor, Business Administration Department and the chair of the Global Diversity Council, said this event is one of the ways to bring diversity to the SC4 students.

Master of ceremonies, Reverend Tony Miller, explained that so many years after his death, King is still doing stuff for our community and nation.

“It is a continual effort, it never stops (battle against racism),” said Miller.

Jerilyn Brown, President of the Port Huron branch of the NAACP, addressed the audience, explaining she felt community involvement to be very important.

“There are still a few of us that have not picked up the cross, especially in these tough economic times,” said Brown.

Brown feels that if more people don’t get involved, than our country is in danger of losing an entire generation.

“I am surprised at the number of kids who don’t know who Dr. King is,” said Brown.

Kimbro also felt it important to continue informing and reaching out to youth in our communities.

“It takes a whole village to do away with racism,” said Kimbro.

Clockwise: 1. South Park Men’s Chorus, under the direction of John Kidd, sang gospel songs at the event. 2. SC4 student, Alesandra Christmas performed an inspirational dance during the event. 3. Lurlene Nicholas, daughter of SC4 MLK event founder, Geri Kimbro, sang the Negro National Anthem at the event on Jan. 16. 4. Reverend David Nichols delivered the “I have a Dream” speech, Jan 16. 5. SC4 alumnus Geri Kimbro, SC4 MLK event founder, and member of SC4 Global Diversity Council.
Clockwise: 1. South Park Men’s Chorus, under the direction of John Kidd, sang gospel songs at the event. 2. SC4 student, Alesandra Christmas performed an inspirational dance during the event. 3. Lurlene Nicholas, daughter of SC4 MLK event founder, Geri Kimbro, sang the Negro National Anthem at the event on Jan. 16. 4. Reverend David Nichols delivered the “I have a Dream” speech, Jan 16. 5. SC4 alumnus Geri Kimbro, SC4 MLK event founder, and member of SC4 Global Diversity Council.

Young journalists

Liz Whittemore

Ginger Elf

The two year old program of the Erie Square Gazette going to Woodrow Wilson is expanding.

After being contacted by Hannah Palmer, a third grade teacher at Woodrow Wilson Elementary School in Port Huron, the SC4 student-run newspaper the Erie Square Gazette (ESG) have been visiting the school teaching the children how to be a journalist.

Erie Square Gazette staff writer, Christina Stoutenburg, helps the children brainstorm ideas for their article on Nov. 30, 2011.  Photo Credit: Liz Whittemore
Erie Square Gazette staff writer, Christina Stoutenburg, helps the children brainstorm ideas for their article on Nov. 30, 2011. Photo Credit: Liz Whittemore

After the Erie Square Gazette’s Coats for Kids campaign last year, the ESG received thank you letters from Palmer’s third grade class. Some of the students had received some of the donated coats.

“Hannah and I talked. She shared that her students didn’t get some of the breaks in life that other kids had, so I decided to do something about it, thus the idea of Erie Square Gazette goes to Woodrow Wilson was born, ” said Twana Pinskey, Editor-in-Chief of the Erie Square Gazette.

The class learns how to write articles and even make their own paper, the Palmer Town News.

“The support that SC4 has given in this project has been incredible. Shawn Starkey has readily assisted with anything I have needed. He even helps by getting the paper printed for us,” said Pinskey.

According to Pinskey, starting in January the Erie Square Gazette will visit Cleveland Elementary School in Port Huron, where they will be able to extend the program there with two fifth grade classes.

After speaking with Pinskey, Paul Miller, a SC4 adjunct instructor, advisor for the school’s radio program WSGR-FM (91.3), and the host for the WPHM Morning Show (1380 am) at “Radio First” is looking into expanding the program to include the radio broadcast segment.

“I think it’s a great idea and it sounds like everything the ESG has done has gone really well. So hopefully we can replicate that with the radio program,” said Miller.

The most recent trip to Woodrow Wilson was on Nov. 30, 2011.

Zachary Penzien, cartoonist and Production Editor for the Erie Square Gazette, went on the visit for the first time.

“I was super psyched when I asked them to draw whatever they liked, and a little girl started drawing ‘Pokémon.’ Best thing ever,” said Penzien.

Erie Square Gazette Production Editor, Zachary Penzien, teaches the children how to draw cartoons on Nov. 30, 2011. Photo Credit: Liz Whittemore
Erie Square Gazette Production Editor, Zachary Penzien, teaches the children how to draw cartoons on Nov. 30, 2011. Photo Credit: Liz Whittemore

Clay Kimball, a dual enrolled student at SC4 and Northern High School as well as Webmaster for the Erie Square Gazette, also went on the recent visit.

“The kids, they really look up to us. It feels good knowing that we’re helping out the next generation. I’m glad that I get to be part of this great experience,” said Kimball.

Rachel Kobylas, Global Awareness Club President, participated in one of the first visits to Woodrow Wilson.

“It was really cool to be able to utilize the experiences that we’ve had in college to encourage these children to move forward with their own hopes and dreams, but it was also really amazing to be able to be right there, sitting on the floor with them and sharing their dreams,” said Kobylas.

“My favorite memory hands down was when we delivered the first ever issue to the children. A little boy named Ethan saw his photo in that first issue. He looked at me and says, ‘Miss Twana that says Ethan, that’s me!’ It was an empowering experience for the child to see his name in print. You could see the pride and confidence in the way he carried himself. I had to turn away for a minute because I was getting choked up,” said Pinskey.

“It was a powerful experience twofold, for the children to get this experience from these college students of various age groups and diversity to come into their room, but also for these kids who are 8, 9, or 10 years old pouring their hearts out, such innocence and these amazing dreams that they have and what they want to be when they grow up,” said Kobylas.

On the recent trip to Woodrow Wilson, Hannah Palmer revealed a brand new $250 camera for the class that was purchased via a grant, to encourage the program.

The completed work of the third grade class Woodrow Wilson Elementary can be viewed on the Erie Square Gazette’s website at www. esgonline. org. There is a link to the Palmer Town News in the heading.

Planes, trains and the Blue Water Transit?

The 2011 fiscal year has been tremendous for the Blue Water Area Transit.

Serving the City of Port Huron, Marysville and Fort Gratiot Township, not only have they celebrated their 35 year anniversary this past September, but according to the News Advisory for the BWAT, the transit’s ridership activity has jumped 43% from 2007, with an 11% increase for just this year alone.

Photo by Evan McCausland
Photo by Evan McCausland

One obvious cause of this increase is the drooping local economy and the constant increase in gas prices. The transit system has even helped promote the annual National Dump the Pump day where for some, only public transit systems will be used.

Another cause is the transit’s systems expanded service hours that better accommodate work schedules. These new service hours include evening service Mondays thru Thursdays until 11:00 p.m., late night weekend service Friday and Saturdays until 3 a.m., weekday morning service starting as early as 5:15 a.m. on demand and even offers dial-a-ride service in Fort Gratiot, Burtchville and Port Huron Township.

According to American Public Transportation Association, this replacement of self-driven vehicles is saving riders a significant $819 a month.

The American Public Transportation Association’s President, William Millar, states that investing more in public transportation will better prepare them for the larger demand now, and what will occur when the recession ends.

For instance, the federal State of Good Repair Program awarded BWAT a $6.86 million grant for a proposed transit hub. It was also among 300 competitive discretionary grants totaling more than $900 million to rebuild and renovate America’s transit infrastructure. Specifically, $46.7 million was awarded to Michigan transit agencies.

According to FTA, these grants will “put people to work by building needed transit facilities and by putting more clean-fuel buses on the road.” This providing many economic favorable changes is a start in the right direction that many residents have been patiently longing for.

Meghan Grady

Staff Writer


Backpack, backpack

Your backpack may not have a talking map like Dora the Explorer’s, unless you have an iPod in it.

According to www. collegestudentsafety .com, items such as textbooks, cell phones and i-pods are stolen from back packs left unattended.

The reason given is that textbooks can be quickly converted into cash, especially at the end of a semester when returned books can be easily converted to their current cash value. Unlike most stolen property, which is converted to a cash value much less than actual value, the web site said textbooks can be taken back to a college bookstore for a full refund under certain circumstances.

According to the SC4 campus bookstore manager, Amanda Beliveau, shelving units are provided for students to store personal items while in store shopping on campus.

Beliveau explained their store has not experienced theft of student property while students are in the store.

“The campus bookstore does not advise students leave valuables such as cell phone, laptops or wallets unattended,” replied Beliveau. She offered that students can carry baskets provided by the store for shopping and safe keeping of valuables while shopping.

The items were discovered next to an open window on Nov 15. Photo Credit: Twana Pinskey
The items were discovered next to an open window on Nov 15. Photo Credit: Twana Pinskey

The college bookstore web site at Henry Ford Community College (collegestore .hfcc.) suggests that if students store their books in their back pack, they should keep the back pack closed and carry it with them at all times.

The hfcc web site explained books visible sticking out of book bags in the library, open on food court tables, lying on backseats of cars and sitting on the floors are easy targets for theft.

Beliveay explained the store has the capability to add notes in the computer system to assist bookstore staff in identification of stolen books that may be returned for money. She suggests students place an indentifying mark specific to their text books (I/E: a smiley faces on page 10 of each of your text books.)This means that if a thief were to try and sell a stolen textbook to the Bookstore, they would be unable to do so.

If a student should find themselves the victim of theft, they should immediately notify Campus Patrol at: (810)989-5757 and the Bookstore at: (810)989-5725.

Twana Pinskey

Editor-in-Chief


Lambda Mu and SC4: 50 years together

The Phi Theta Kappa Mini Honors Conference was hosted here on campus Oct. 28-30, 2011, by SC4’s Lambda Mu Chapter of PTK with 133 people in attendance.

The honors study topic, “Democratization of Information: Power, Peril, or Promise” set the theme for the weekend.

Professor Becky Lubbers opened the conference with her presentation, “The Impact of the Internet on Social Media and the Political Arena.”

On Saturday, Professor Emeritus Tom Obee, recently retired from SC4, opened the College Completion initiative session with his presentation, “The Allegory of the Farm.”

Phi Theta Kappa International Honor Society members across the Michigan region were strongly encouraged to join the C4 College Completion Initiative. To work with administration and faculty at our community colleges to meet the goals set forth by President Obama to achieve higher graduation/completion rates.

During the afternoon sessions, conference attendees filled the North Building to hear more about the effects technology has on our lives today.

Michael J. Wisniewski Jr., of Schoolcraft College, President of the Michigan Regional Board of Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society, attended the PTK Mini-Honors hosted by the SC4 chapter of Phi Theta Kappa-Lambda Mu on the SC4 campus. Photo Credit: Twana Pinskey
Michael J. Wisniewski Jr., of Schoolcraft College, President of the Michigan Regional Board of Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society, attended the PTK Mini-Honors hosted by the SC4 chapter of Phi Theta Kappa-Lambda Mu on the SC4 campus. Photo Credit: Twana Pinskey

Business Instructor Jeff Arnold gave two presentations, “A Business Perspective of Stephen R. Covey’s Book ‘The 7 Habits of  Highly Effective People’” and “Motivational Advice and Stories” with a full house at each presentation.

Professor Rob Richardson also gave his presentation, “Too Much of a Good Thing: Revealing Some of the Risks Associated with Everyday Technology” in two separate sessions.

Shawn Starkey, SC4’s Executive Director of Public Relations, Marketing, and Legislative Affairs, addressed how media and digitized information effect the way we communicate and get information in his presentation, “Who are the People in your Neighborhood.”

International honor society members joined together to celebrate the fiftieth anniversary of the charter of the Lambda Mu chapter of Phi Theta Kappa at St. Clair County Community College.

Upcoming Phi Theta Kappa events: an induction on Nov. 12, a blood drive on Nov. 28 and 29, and the start of the food drive on Nov. 28.

Stacy Desimone

Guest Writer