“Our Town” rocks our town

SC4 players bring emotion to the Fine Arts Theater
Lauren Schwartz
Staff Writer
“Our Town,” written by Thornton Wilder, is a play set the small town of Grover’s Corners. It opens with the stage manager (Tom Kephart) literally setting up the first scene, explaining the layout of the town and moving in furniture for “those who think they have to have scenery.” Roughly 85 people showed up to watch the cast creating a small town feel and maintain the time period that “Our Town” took place in.
As someone who grew up in a small town where everybody knows everybody and their parents, this play was extremely relatable for me. Especially in the first act, which was entitled: ‘Daily life.’ However, one thing that struck me as odd in this production, was the lack of props used by the cast. For example, in some scenes, the cast would shadow eat and drink, which took away a bit of the realness.
The first two acts were a wonderful way to watch two young people fall in love; in act two especially. In the scene, George Gibbs (Marcus Taylor) and Emily Webb (Emma Dunlop) realized their mutual love for each other while on a date. From body language to shaky voices, Taylor and Dunlop sold it like they were actually falling in love.
The final act was a tearjerker to say the least. The act opens at Emily Webb’s funeral, who has just died during childbirth. Emily’s spirit joins the rest of the dead including Mrs. Gibbs (Gwen Allen), her mother-in-law, and her brother, Wally Webb (Donovan Paldanius). Emily is dazed and confused and, despite the warnings from the others, decides to relive her fondest memory—her twelfth birthday.
Upon arrival of her memory, the stage manager reminds her of the events that occurred on the day. She sees Howie Newsome (Dalton Doyle) and Constable Warren (Jim Jones), who were amongst the dead. She notes that they are both dead, but doesn’t let affect her mood when she sees her family.
Upon realization that they can no longer see her, she realizes how fast everything went, and asks the stage manager to take her back to her grave. After another stunning performance by Dunlop, there was not a dry eye in the theatre.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>