Bigots in disguise

The difference between love and hate

Gregory Garofalo
Managing Editor

Recently, Bill 1062 was vetoed by the Governor of Arizona due its anti-constitutional and discriminatory nature. The bill, if it had passed, would have given business owners the right to refuse business to any person who is openly homosexual due to religious belief.
The Bill was vetoed almost instantly as it is a clear bill of discrimination. However, Steve Yarbrough is one of the remaining Republicans still backing the bill.
“People need to be able to exercise their religion freely in this state.” Yarbrough said to foxpheonix.com.
The question I find myself asking is: What religious right is being infringed?
Yarbrough is an openly Christian senator and due to his support and backing of 1062, it is blatantly obvious where his stance is when it comes to homosexuality. As a Christian myself I find this bill and its reasoning to be absurd.
“‘Love your neighbor as yourself’ There is no commandment greater than these,” Mark 12:31.
When did the command to love become optional? The thing about the bill is that it just uses the freedom of religion as a banner to excuse blatant bigotry and tainting the term Christians across the board.
“When you think of Christians, this is the kind of thing people think of,” said Austin Macey, sophomore at SC4.
Christianity is a religion of acceptance and peace; above all else it is a faith of love. Jesus didn’t associate himself with the religious bigots of the time. Instead, Christ would seek out those with a great heart of faith and love for one another, no background check required.
Like with any religion, this group of bigots does not represent the entirety of the faith as most Christians are sincere in their beliefs being kind and loving people.
Christians should use this instance as an opportunity and do their best to prove the stereotype wrong by speaking out against atrocities like this. And non-Christians should try to understand the difference between a sincere Christian and a bigot in disguise.

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