Regifting

Regifting

Liz Whittemore

Photo Editor

 

Force yourself to smile, say thank you, and look enthusiastic.

We’ve all had that moment during the holidays. A distant relative suddenly feels the need to buy you a gift, though they have no idea what you need or would like. Upon presentation of the gift, we have two main options: either pretend to love the gift or try not to hurt their feelings while being honest.

I still cringe at the thought of the year my parents got me almost all Twilight-themed gifts based solely on the fact that they knew I had read the books. Since then I’ve developed an Amazon wish list, though I still live in fear throughout the month of December.

Illustration by Liz Whittemore

Regifting is a common practice during the holidays. According to Arizona Business Magazine’s writer Shelby Hill, 40 percent of regifters live in the northeast region, and more than one third (36 percent) of regifters are between 18 to 29-years-old.

“If you receive a gift that doesn’t fit into your personality, it is perfectly fine to regift it,” said SC4 Student Government Treasurer Andrew Kreiner.

“A couple years ago at a Christmas party I was given a cheetah print snuggie. I knew I would never wear it, so I rewrapped it and gave it to my little sister. She absolutely loves it and wears it often during winter,” said Kreiner.

Though you are most likely stuck if you receive a creepy china doll that resembles you, items such as gift cards are much easier to regift.

Websites such as giftcardrescue.com, plasticjungle.com, Ebay, or barterquest.com are common options for either trading or selling your gifts or gift cards.

“If I found that I didn’t have a use for it, and that someone else would enjoy the gift more I would regift,” said SC4 student Kayleigh Barnowske.

You can avoid unwanted gifts by advertising the fact that you have a wish list. Having it online where it is easier to access and not at risk of getting lost means family or friends won’t have to struggle to find something to get you. In turn, you are less likely to receive something undesirable.

Should you luck out this holiday and enjoy all that you receive, regiftable.com has bad gift horror stories. Feel free this holiday to sit back with a cup of hot chocolate and chuckle at other people’s misfortune.

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