Paint it, peel it, carve it

Paint it, peel it, carve it

Danielle Kennedy
Copy Editor

Pumpkin carving, one of the few activities where people are encouraged to stab something with a sharp object.

But now a day it’s not at all uncommon for people to set their knives and tiny saws aside for some different tools.

One of those tools is paint.

Whether it is a parent with young children, or someone that just doesn’t want to go through the hassle of cutting and gutting a pumpkin, paint is often a go to tool for pumpkin decorating. While painting a pumpkin decreases a person’s chance of cutting themselves, they have to be more careful when picking their pumpkin.

Bumps on the pumpkin can be a hindrance when painting, and may even be a blemish if they’re big enough to remain noticeable once the job is complete. Dampness on the pumpkin’s skin can also be a hindrance, but easily remedied by wiping the pumpkin with a dry cloth.

People have also traded the usual carving tools for sculpting tools. This allows the user to peel away the pumpkin’s skin in layers. Gives them a bit more control over what they’re crafting.

It takes patience, but if a person can stick it out, they can end up with some awesome results. Some of the works out there that have been done with this method look more like they belong in a museum than sitting on someone’s front porch.

That’s not to say that the traditional method of carving pumpkins is disappearing. People can still go walk down the street to see traditional jack-o-lanterns resting on the porches of many homes.

It’s just that one shouldn’t be surprised if they see a not so traditional jack-o-lantern resting right beside it. And as time goes by, maybe even more methods of pumpkin decorating will arise.

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