Remembering the Legacy: ten years of celebrating King at SC4

Twana Pinskey

Editor-in-Chief

The message of equality rings as loudly today as it did 44 years ago.

St. Clair County Community College hosted their Tenth Annual Martin Luther King Jr. Day Celebration Monday, Jan 16, 2012 at the fine arts building.

According to SC4 Public Relations Director, Shawn Starkey, over 200 people attended the event.

King, a civil rights leader, was killed in Memphis, Tennessee, on April 4, 1968.

According to event founder, Geri Kimbro, this event was started to assure King’s message would not be forgotten.

Kimbro is also a member of the SC4 Global Diversity Advisory Council and a SC4 alumnus. Kimbro gave the introduction at the event.

Kimbro explained the message of equality still needs to be taught.

“It begins at home. It is up to the parents to teach our children,” said Kimbro.

Kimbro said she had the opportunity to meet King and his wife in 1967-1968.

“I actually sang in a church choir with Coretta King,” said Kimbro.

Pete Lacey, SC4 Vice President of Student Services, Adjunct Instructor, Business Administration Department and the chair of the Global Diversity Council, said this event is one of the ways to bring diversity to the SC4 students.

Master of ceremonies, Reverend Tony Miller, explained that so many years after his death, King is still doing stuff for our community and nation.

“It is a continual effort, it never stops (battle against racism),” said Miller.

Jerilyn Brown, President of the Port Huron branch of the NAACP, addressed the audience, explaining she felt community involvement to be very important.

“There are still a few of us that have not picked up the cross, especially in these tough economic times,” said Brown.

Brown feels that if more people don’t get involved, than our country is in danger of losing an entire generation.

“I am surprised at the number of kids who don’t know who Dr. King is,” said Brown.

Kimbro also felt it important to continue informing and reaching out to youth in our communities.

“It takes a whole village to do away with racism,” said Kimbro.

Clockwise: 1. South Park Men’s Chorus, under the direction of John Kidd, sang gospel songs at the event. 2. SC4 student, Alesandra Christmas performed an inspirational dance during the event. 3. Lurlene Nicholas, daughter of SC4 MLK event founder, Geri Kimbro, sang the Negro National Anthem at the event on Jan. 16. 4. Reverend David Nichols delivered the “I have a Dream” speech, Jan 16. 5. SC4 alumnus Geri Kimbro, SC4 MLK event founder, and member of SC4 Global Diversity Council.

Clockwise: 1. South Park Men’s Chorus, under the direction of John Kidd, sang gospel songs at the event. 2. SC4 student, Alesandra Christmas performed an inspirational dance during the event. 3. Lurlene Nicholas, daughter of SC4 MLK event founder, Geri Kimbro, sang the Negro National Anthem at the event on Jan. 16. 4. Reverend David Nichols delivered the “I have a Dream” speech, Jan 16. 5. SC4 alumnus Geri Kimbro, SC4 MLK event founder, and member of SC4 Global Diversity Council.

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